Valuable insight into social tagging as a form of linked data

Facet Publishing announce the release of Social Tagging in a Linked Data Environment, edited by Dr Diane Rasmussen Pennington and Dr Louise Spiteri

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Social tagging (including hashtags) is used over platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, WordPress, Tumblr and YouTube across countries and cultures meaning that one single hashtag can link information from a variety of resources. Social Tagging in a Linked Data Environment explores social tagging as a potential form of linked data and shows how it can provide an increasingly important way to categorise and store information resources.

Shawne D. Miksa, Associate Professor at the University of North Texas said,

“Pennington and Spiteri have pulled together a kaleidoscope of scenarios that explore the role and evolution of social tagging. From traditional library discovery systems and recommender systems to ontologies for dementia, effects on public policy to cognitive authority in Facebook communities, to Web 2.0, Web 3.0, and beyond. Tagging and linking—two words that imply so much more than what they say—provide the core for this work. A valuable collection for anyone wanting to explore the possibilities of letting people have their say through the simple act of contributing their own words.”

The book will be essential reading for practicing library and information professionals involved in electronic access to collections, including cataloguers, system developers, information architects and web developers. It will also be useful for students taking programmes in library and Information science, information management, computer science, and information architecture.

Brian O’Connor, Professor at the University of North Texas said,

“Pennington, Spiteri, and their thoughtful contributing authors give us a thesaurus, a treasure chest of concepts, constructs, and tools for building new means of navigating constellations of people authoring, publishing, and looking for information. How do we find useful information? How do we bring information to the point of use? How do we determine veracity and cognitive authority of information? Who is now to link what with whom? Here the reader will find much to use and much to ponder”.

Find out more about the book here

About the authors:9781783303380

Diane Rasmussen Pennington is a Lecturer in Information Science at the University of Strathclyde. Diane worked as a corporate IT professional and then a systems librarian before becoming a full-time academic in 2005. Diane’s PhD dissertation focused on social tagging practices of photojournalism professionals, and tagging has remained as a central focus of her research. Diane served as the Association for Information Science & Technology’s Social Media Manager from 2014-2016.

Louise Spiteri is Associate Professor at the School of Information Management, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Louise’s areas of research interest focus on social tagging, user-generated metadata, discovery systems, classification systems, and taxonomies. Louise’s most recent research has focused on the creation of taxonomies for affect, based on an analysis of user-generated reviews and content in public library catalogue records.

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Information in your workplace: is it working for you?

Guest post by Professor Ian Ruthven, co-editor of Information at Work: Information management in the workplace

We live in a society characterized by quick technological developments and rapid processes of change. Technological developments have automated processes that used to be done by manual labour whilst new professions and work tasks have emerged. Earlier generations were accustomed to life-long positions in the same company. Nowadays people search for work opportunities in a global market, experience more frequent career changes, must learn new skills throughout their careers and manage the increasingly fluid boundaries between work life and home life. Even our work environments have changed: as Alvin Toffler’s metaphor of the ‘paperless offices’ from 50 years ago is now being realized, we are starting to move into the state of ‘peopleless offices’ in which work is conducted in digital rather than physical spaces. Many workplaces are already now hybrid digital/physical spaces where the work activities addressed, tools utilized and information consumed are the same no matter if engaged in the office or at home.

Rapid changes to information infrastructures are also changing the nature of work forcing a reinvention of old practices and the creation of new ones. For example, bloggers and online newspapers are now as influential as traditional journalism; social media is now a key means of interacting with customers instead of direct marketing; many services such as banking, home-buying, booking travel and commerce are now primarily online activities created by experts in digital environments rather than experts in built environments; government services are increasingly online services, etc. The vast amount of Internet information means that even traditional information experts such as doctors are taking on larger roles in explaining information rather than providing information. There is hardly a discipline or area of work that is not touched by new technology.

More data, more information, more work

The relatively inexpensive information storage available now means organizations can capture massive amounts of data which can be mined to provide more robust decision-making about managing cities, predicting demographic changes, tailoring marketing campaigns or managing simple performance. How this information is stored, organized, classified, shared and secured are classic information management concerns which need new proven solutions. Many organizations are moving towards cloud services forcing hard discussions about which information to store, where it is stored, and who has access rights to this information.

This change in how we store, manage and make available information is set against a fluid background of changing legislation surrounding what organizations can and cannot do with information. Rights to access information, rights to information privacy, rights to data protection, and other assorted information laws vary locally, nationally, and internationally resulting in a complex and shifting network of laws, policies and guidelines that institutions must create systems and practices to manage. The role of information is essential in all these processes, as a resource for learning, managing change, developing and running processes and creating professional networks.

The information revolution within our workplaces calls for a new examination of information, information technology and information practices within the modern workplace. There is no single framework nor epistemological perspective that single-handedly explains the entire phenomena of workplace information, but rather the different work situations are made of aggregations where information plays in from several perspectives.

How to study the work place from an information perspective?

This richness of views on workplace information leads to different understandings of information-related activities, such as information need, information management, information sources, information sharing, information production, information storing, information retrieval, information searching/seeking, information valuing, and information use. Some of these concepts have been discussed since the beginning of workplace information studies, while others are new concepts coming from the latest trends and developments in workplace information environments. The richness of approaches and varying meanings for concepts can create deep understandings but also conceptual confusion.9781783302758

One of the motivations for our new book Information at Work is that such themes and concepts are often considered separately, by distinct groupings of scholars, and appearing in venues that offer little interaction between these topics. This, in part, comes from the perspective taken by individual authors – our disciplinary backgrounds bring their own theories, models and ways of looking at the world and, hence, different ways of approaching the study of information in the workplace. These different approaches can focus on different objects of study (environments, systems, tasks, objects, practices etc.), some of which are more amenable to certain theories and ways of doing research than others. Each perspective is valuable in highlighting different aspects of what it means to study workplace information. Bringing these perspectives together in one text we hope will show the diversity in this rich area of study and promote new discussions on how we can appreciate these perspectives to create new ways of investigating and understanding different phenomena within the field of workplace information.
Our aim in this book is to present the full spectrum of workplace information research, flowing from contributions on the nature of work when viewed from an Information Science perspective, through considerations of the social and cultural environments in which we work, to issues of managing our work and the information we need to do work, to discussions of the information artefacts and properties of those artefacts that enable us to ‘work’ with information to complete our ‘work’.

As information professionals, how often do we consider whether our workplace information environments are working for us?

Ian Ruthven is a Professor of Information Seeking and Retrieval at the University of Strathclyde. He published over 100 articles in the areas of interactive information retrieval and information seeking and edited two collections: Interactive Information Seeking, Behaviour and Retrieval (with Diane Kelly) and Cultural Heritage Information Access and Management (with Gobinda Chowdhury).

Information Rights for Records Managers

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Information Rights for Records Managers by Rachel Maguire, Records Manager and Data Protection Officer at the London School of Economics.

Information Rights is a term covering legislation that allows the request of information from a public sector organisation. This book will help records managers, information managers, archivists and librarians who find themselves with responsibility for managing information rights at their organisations.

Information Rights for Records Managers goes through the big three – Data Protection, Freedom of Information and the Environmental Information Regulations – but also the other legislation in this area that covers how to respond to requests for information. For those acting as an organisation’s expert in this area, this book will point to all the needed legislation.

Content covered includes:9781783302444

  • Freedom of Information – based on the UK and Scottish Acts, how
  • to recognise a request and to how to draft a response
  • Data Protection Act (DPA) to General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – the evolution from managing personal data under the old UK DPA to the new requirements of the GDPR and new UK DPA
  • Data Protection requests – managing requests for and relating to personal data from data subjects
  • Data Protection enquiries – covers the likely enquiries you will get from staff relating to data protection, including privacy notices and data protection impact assessments
  • Environmental Information Regulations – based on the UK and Scottish Regulations, how to recognise and respond to requests for environmental information
  • Records management – the basic methods of managing records so that you can easily respond to information rights requests
  • Resources – links to the resources available online to help you with your information rights work.

The book will be useful reading for anyone who has responsibility, or is interested in taking on responsibility, for managing information rights in organisations including records managers, archivists, librarians and information managers. Its introductory nature will also mean that it will be very useful students and new professionals seeking to increase their knowledge.

Rachael Maguire is the Records Manager and Data Protection Officer at the London School of Economics, covering records management, data protection and freedom of information. She has been working in the fields of information management and information rights for two decades, mainly in the public sector. She has a Masters in Information Rights Law, is a Fellow of the Information and Records Management Society (IRMS) and on the Accreditation Sub Committee of the IRMS, as well as on the Editorial Board of the Records Management Journal.

Information Rights for Records Managers | 224pp | paperback: 9781783302444 | £69.95 | hardback: 9781783302451 | £139.95 | eBook: 9781783302468

The book is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD. It is available in North America from the American Library Association.

New edition of Philip Hider’s essential information organization textbook

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the second edition of Information Resource Description: Creating and managing metadata.

 The second edition of Information Resource Description provides an overview of the range of activities and the products of these activities collectively referred to as ‘information organization’ and will be ideal for  LIS students, information professionals wishing to specialise in this field, and existing metadata specialists who wish to update their knowledge.

Author Philip Hider said, “While much of the general thrust of the first edition of this book remains applicable, some of the specifics have changed in significant ways since it was published in 2012. The library cataloguing code, Resource Description and Access, has now been adopted by most libraries in the English-speaking world, and related standards such as BIBFRAME are coming into view as more concrete propositions. The book is fully updated to reflect these changes.”9781783302239

The book explains how the various elements and values of descriptive metadata support a set of common information retrieval functions across a wide range of environments. Through this unifying framework, the book provides an integrated commentary of the various fields and practices of information organization carried out by today’s information professionals and end-users.

Key topics and updates to the first edition include:

  • discussion of big data vs the traditional database model
  • introduces and applies the FRBR-LRM user tasks
  • expanded coverage of scholarly repositories and questions around Open Access
  • new section on the history of information organization
  • expanded discussion of the functions, economics and management of metadata
  • a new section on mobile access.

David Bawden, Professor of Information Science at City, University of London and co-editor of Facet’s Foundations of the Information Sciences series, said, “As we enter the infosphere, and documents in an increasing variety of forms and media become ever more essential for our society, so the problems of organizing information increase. This second edition of Philip Hider’s book addresses one essential component: the organizing of information resources through their description. Its focus on general principles expressed in different contexts, and its equal treatment of systems, sources and processes, makes it a valuable addition to the Foundations of the Information Sciences series.”

– Ends

Information Resource Description: Creating and managing metadata | October 2018 | 288pp | paperback: 9781783302239 | £59.95 | hardback: 9781783302246 | £119.95 | eBook: 9781783302253

Philip Hider is Head of the School of Information Studies and Professor of Library and Information Management at Charles Sturt University, Australia. He has worked, taught and researched in the field of information organization in the UK, Singapore and Australia. He holds a PhD from City University, London and was made a Fellow of CILIP in 2004.

The book is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD. It is available in North America from the American Library Association.

75% off The Chief Data Officer’s Playbook

This practical guide is a must-read for data leaders building the foundation of value creation from data.

– Katia Walsh, Chief Global Data and Analytics Officer, Vodafone

CDO_Kindle-ad_Nov-18_v1

Written by two practising CDOs, The Chief Data Officer’s Playbook offers a jargon-free, practical guide to making better decisions based on data.

The Kindle edition of the Playbook is available for £9.99/$12.99/EUR 9.99 (or your equivalent local price) until Friday 30th November. This is a saving of 75% of the usual price.

Use the links below to order today from your local Amazon Kindle store:

The Chief Data Officer’s Playbook is the best overall resource available for CDOs and their teams. The release of this book is perfectly timed. The CDO Club tracks CDO hires globally, and last year alone the number of new CDO hires quintupled. The Playbook is a compendium of essential knowledge anyone operating in the current data environment must have.

– David Mathison, Chairman, CEO and Founder, CDO Club/CDO Summit

Without any doubt, this playbook is a must read for the primary audience, the CDOs. In my opinion, it is equally a must read for the secondary audience, the C-Suite, for the insight on how the role complements their businesses.

– Sham Kashikar, ex-Chief Data Officer, Sales & Marketing, Intel

A wide-ranging overview of how the shift to digital is changing the landscape of archives

Layout 1Facet Publishing announce the publication of Digital Archives:Management, use and access edited by Milena Dobreva.

Today, accessibility to digital content is continuing to expand rapidly and all organizations which collect, preserve and provide access to the collective memory of humankind are expected to provide digital services. Does this transition into digital space require a substantial shift in the professional philosophy, knowledge and practice of archives?

This edited collection attempts to explore these uncharted territories by bringing together inspirational and informative chapters from international experts to help readers understand the drivers for change and their implications for archives. Editor Milena Dobreva said,

“I hope the book will broaden and deepen the thinking and dialogue between all those academics, professionals and students who are working on different aspects of the digital cultural and scientific heritage”.

Reassessment of the role of archives in the digital environment serves to develop critical approaches to current trends in the broader heritage sector, including cultural industries experimenting with sustainable business models for cultural production, digitization of analogue cultural heritage, and the related IPR issues surrounding the re-use of digital objects and data for research, education, advocacy and art.

Professor Kalpana Shankar said,

“Archives and access continue to matter, perhaps more than ever. As digital material proliferates and the tools to manipulate it do so as well, what is real and what is false online become difficult to disambiguate. Human rights, scientific research and ‘wicked’ geopolitical problems (and solving them) rests on accurate and universal access to records and data, whether one is talking about the international crises of forced migration and refugees, human rights, political corruption or climate change. The work of this book is in helping us, the reader, understand how archives and archivists navigate the entanglement of technical, social, organizational and legal challenges they face daily”.

Dr. Milena Dobreva is an Associate Professor at UCL Qatar where she is coordinating the MA in Library and Information Studies leading the introduction of four pathways in the programme including a specialisation on Archives, Records and Data Management. Previously she served as a Head of the Department of Library Information and Archive Sciences at the University of Malta spearheading the redesign and expansion of the departmental portfolio, and as the Founding Head of the first Digitisation Centre in Bulgaria where she was also a member on the Executive Board of the National Commission of UNESCO. Milena is a member of the editorial board of the IFLA Journal, and of the International Journal on Digital Libraries (IJDL) and is the co-editor of User Studies for Digital Library Development (Facet, 2012).

Contributors
Carla Basili, Italian National Research Council and Sapienza University; Pierluigi Feliciati, University of Macerata; Edel Jennings, Waterford Institute of Technology; Enrico Natale, University of Basel; Gillian Oliver, Monash University; Elli Papadopoulou,  European Open Science Cloud pilot project; Oleksandr Pastukhov, University of Malta; Guy Pessach, Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Trudy Huskamp Peterson, archival consultant and certified archivist; Panayiota Polydoratou, Alexander Technological Educational Institute (ATEI) of Thessaloniki; Kalpana Shankar, University College Dublin; Sotirios Sismanis, information professional; Donald Tabone, Middlesex University, Malta.

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New edition of the go-to reference for students and RIM professionals

9781783304301.jpgFacet Publishing announce the publication of Records and Information Management, 2nd edition by Patricia C Franks.

The first edition of Records and Information Management was described by Archives and Records as, ‘a valuable up to date combined textbook and reference book which will enhance its readers’ knowledge irrespective of their place on the career ladder’.  Since its publication in 2013, the records and information field has evolved considerably with the growth of the internet of things; the extreme volume and variety of data produced more quickly than ever; the increased necessity of employing technology to categorize, analyze, and make use of the data; the recognition of the value of information assets; and the emergence of new business models that leverage the power of algorithms to manipulate data.

The new second edition cements this work’s status as an up-to-date classic, with its content updated and expanded to address emerging technologies, most notably blockchain and evolving standards and practices. Franks presents complete coverage of the records and information lifecycle model, encompassing paper, electronic (databases, office suites, email), and new media records (blogs, chat messages, and software as a service). Informed by an advisory board of experts in the field and with contributions by noted authorities, the text addresses such key topics as the origins and development of records and information; the discipline of information governance and developing a strategic records management plan; creation/capture and classification; retention strategies, inactive records management, archives, and long-term preservation; access, storage, and retrieval; electronic records and electronic records management systems; the latest on rapidly evolving technologies such as web records, social media, and mobile devices; vital records, disaster preparedness and recovery, and business continuity; monitoring, auditing, and risk management; and education and training.

Patricia C Franks said,

‘The breadth of knowledge expected of the successful records professional continues to expand. It now includes the need to better understand not only the business process but also the goals of the organization from a business perspective…this book, therefore, differs from traditional records management works by placing equal emphasis on business operations out of which records arise and the ways in which the records professional can contribute to the core mission of the enterprise beyond the lifecycle management of records.’

The book’s authoritative blend of theory and practice makes it a matchless resource for everyone in the archives and records management field, including archivists, records managers, and information managers, regardless of their job title (e.g. digital archivist, knowledge management advisor, information governance specialist).

Patricia C Franks is an associate Professor in the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at San Jos̩ State University in California, where she serves as the Master of Archives and Records Administration (MARA) Program Coordinator and the SLIS Internship Program Coordinator. Dr. Franks supervises virtual interns and teaches courses related to information organizations and management, archival studies, and records management. Her professional activities include working with ARMA International, most recently as Consensus Group Leader for both ANSI/ARMA 1-2011 Implications of Web-Based, Collaborative Technologies in Records Management and ARMA TR 21-2012 Using Social Media in Organizations.

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