The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship wins Art Libraries Society Award

Facet Publishing is pleased to announce that The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship has won the ARLIS/NA Worldwide Books Award for Publications.

Copy of Hamilton & Saunderson

The second edition of The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship was awarded the Worldwide Books Award for Publications at the 46th Annual Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) conference in New York last week.

Editors Paul Glassman and Judy Dyki said,

“We are thrilled that the Handbook was selected by ARLIS/NA for this award since it represents the scholarly research and writing of many Society members and other contributors. It is an honour to receive this recognition from this dynamic professional organization.”

 The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship integrates theory and practice to offer guidelines for materials and collections management, reviews best practice in teaching and learning and presents innovative approaches to knowledge creation, library spaces, promotion and sustainability for information professionals working in art and design environments who need to support and anticipate the information needs of artists, designers, architects and the historians who study those disciplines.

The Worldwide Books Award for Publications recognizes outstanding publications by ARLIS/NA Individual members in librarianship or visual resources curatorship, and the arts. By recognizing special achievement in these areas the Award acknowledges and encourages scholarly publication by the ARLIS/NA membership.

Find out more about the book, including a free sample chapter here.

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Disseminating information research worldwide

Helen Carley, Publishing Director, Facet Publishing and Damian Mitchell, Commissioning Editor, Facet Publishing


At Facet Publishing we endeavour to commission and publish high quality, authoritative content for the information scholar and practitioner worldwide. We are committed to advancing the profession and publishing material that will prepare and inform students and researchers to meet the challenges of the future.

Cultural Heritage Information: Access and management – Edited by Ian Ruthven and G G Chowdhury

We support scholars and researchers throughout the publishing process ensuring every book we publish is peer reviewed, available through green open access, optimized for discoverability, professionally designed, copyedited and printed at speed. Every title receives a worldwide, bespoke marketing push to maximise impact. Find out more about what we offer below.

Scholarly publications from leading researchers worldwide

For students, academics, early career and next generation researchers, we commission and publish scholarly research in monographs and edited collections from some of the leading scholars in the world. We aim to address the critical information issues of our time by commissioning current active research in established topics and adjacent fields, you can see some of our latest examples here.

Peer review

All of our scholarly titles are peer reviewed by specifically selected scholars and we offer open/single blind/double-blind review depending on the wishes of our authors. For the iResearch series we have a bespoke editorial board.  We also use our editorial advisory team, comprising thought leaders from around the world, in a variety of sectors as a sounding board for our list development ideas.

Open access

We know how important it is for our academics to upload their research to their institutional repository directly after publication in order to share their research/practice as widely as possible. In order to facilitate this, we have a green open access policy  that supports an author’s right to voluntarily self-archive their work without embargo or payment. We are open and flexible with our authors and invite discussion of our policies.


We are committed to increasing the discoverability of our authors’ content. The full text of all our books is discoverable through Google scholar and library discovery services. We aid discovery by individually indexing our book chapters with DOIs, adding carefully selected keywords and expertly chosen book trade subject codes.  Our books are available in print and digitally throughout the world.


We are expert, agile marketers and ensure our titles are offered for review in leading relevant journals around the world. In addition, we target scholarly communities through social media to ensure that scholars from Mumbai to Jakarta and from Syracuse to Durban are aware of new content relevant to them. We select the most appropriate conferences and seminars and ensure that our authors’ content is represented to its target readership.

Care and quality

We pride ourselves on our attention to detail. As a small team we can be highly flexible and responsive. We are able to give our authors the care and attention they require from inception through to post publication. We work closely with our writers to develop their proposals, nurture them through the writing process and offer them the best editorial and production support that we can. We are quick to market, dynamic, and possess many years of combined experience across academic and professional publishing.

Talk to us

If you’d like to know more about how we can work with you and help get your original research published and brilliantly marketed in a rapid time frame, talk to Damian or Helen or come and chat with us at the iConference in Sheffield.

Helen Carley is Publishing Director at Facet Publishing and can be reached on

Damian Mitchell is Commissioning Editor at Facet Publishing and can be reached on

Our new catalogue is out now


Our new catalogue, featuring all our new and forthcoming titles as well as bestsellers and key backlist, is out now.

Download a PDF of the catalogue here

Browse the catalogue online here

If you would like a printed copy, send an email to and we will post one out to you.

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Love Data Week 2018 Roundup

Last week Facet participated in Love Data Week, a 5-day online international event ‘to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services.’ We asked our authors  to share their data stories and each responded with a different approach. You’ll find a summary of each post published during the week below.

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David Haynes, author of brand new Metadata for Information Management and Retrieval, 2nd edition, began the week with an exploration of the ethical implications for metadata gathering and uses in his post Metadata – have we got the ethics right?

Next up, Selena Killick, co-author of the forthcoming Putting Library Assessment Data to Work, explained how library data can be used to measure student success in Data is the new oil

Sara Mannheimer and Ryer Banta, co-contributors to The Complete Guide to Personal Digital Archiving, shared their data success story in Building Bridges – in which they offer advice for introducing students to research data management skills through something everyone can relate to—organizing personal digital files.

Bringing the week to a close Andrew Cox, co-author of the forthcoming Exploring Research Data Management, took a look at the future for academic libraries in The Growing Importance of Data in Academic Libraries

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New research on the architecture, design and evaluation of online information systems and services

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the second book in the iResearch series, Information Systems: Process and practice, edited by Christine Urquhart, Dr Faten Hamad, Dr Dina Tbaishat  and Alison Yeoman

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Design and evaluation of information systems and services have remained an area of study and research in many disciplines ranging from computing and information systems, information and library studies, to business management. Each discipline aims to address a set of unique challenges as they are seen from their disciplinary background and perspectives. This results in research that often fails to take a holistic view of information systems including technologies, people and context. This second title in the iResearch series addresses this challenge by bringing together different viewpoints and perspectives of information systems design and evaluation from the contributors’ own diverse and yet complimentary areas of teaching and research interests.

Co-editor Christine Urquhart said, “This book attempts to bridge some of the gaps between discrete areas of research that information professionals could use to design helpful and effective information systems and services.  Our aim is to provide a critical analysis, with supporting case studies of library and information service and systems architecture – in a very broad interpretation of the term architecture”.

The book will be essential reading for researchers in information science, specifically in the areas of digital libraries, information architecture and information systems. It will also be useful for practitioners and students in these areas seeking to understand research issues and challenges and to discover how they have been handled in practice elsewhere.

iResearch series editor G G Chowdhury said,

‘This is not just another book on information architecture that focuses on content architecture alone; the research and development activities reported in this book also cover the other end of the spectrum concerned with service evaluation, performance management and library assessment. The 14 chapters in this book, written by academics and researchers from different research backgrounds and viewpoints, offer a significant contribution to research and practices in the architecture, design and evaluation of online information systems and services.’

About the authors

Christine Urquhart was a full-time member of staff in the Department of Information Studies, Aberystwyth University. Since retiring from full-time teaching she has continued to pursue her research interests.

Dr Faten Hamad is an Assistant Professor in the Library and Information Science Department, University of Jordan.

Dr Dina Tbaishat is an Assistant Professor at the University of Jordan, Library and Information Science Department.

Alison Yeoman was formerly a Research Officer in the Department of Information Studies, Aberystwyth University and is now an independent researcher.

With contributions from: Sally Burford, Catherine M. Burns, Karen Colbron, Adam Euerby, Fernando Loizides, Aekaterini Mavri, Paula Ormandy and Cristina Vasilica.


For more information about the book and to read a sample chapter click here


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The Growing Importance of Data in Academic Libraries

Guest post by Andrew Cox, co-author of the forthcoming book, Exploring Research Data Management

In a globalising world the future is complicated. It is not simply a matter of new trends impacting library work in clearly defined ways. Rather change seems to be impacting our work in complex ways. In a recent report on the future of academic libraries (Pinfield, Cox and Rutter, 2017) we sought to address this complexity by proposing that we think in terms of nexuses of change. Two major ones we identified were:

  • “The dataification of research” -combining trends such as open access, open science, text and data mining, artificial intelligence and machine learning, the internet of things, digital humanities and academic social networking services, and
  • “Connected learning” -incorporating changing pedagogies, learning analytics, students as customers, social media, mobile computing, maker spaces and blurring of space uses.

A story that seems to be threaded through these changes is the growing importance of data.

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Photo by Joshua Sortino on Unsplash

Research data management

Thus one aspect of change in research practice is the way that the valued outputs of research are increasingly not confined to written outputs, but also seen to lie in the underlying research data. If made discoverable and useable these data can be the foundation for new research. Research Data Management is the emergent set of professional practices that supports this emphasis. Librarians have had a big part in how this story has unfolded.

Text Data Mining

Another data related change in research is the way that texts in the library are increasingly to be seen as data for Text and Data Mining (TDM). When there are literally hundreds of thousands of research papers on a topic, a manually conducted “comprehensive literature review” becomes an impossibility. Rather we will need the help of text mining algorithms that seek out patterns in the corpus of texts. It is libraries that are seeking to create the legal and technical infrastructure in which TDM can be carried out.

Learner Analytics

Learning is also undergoing a data revolution. Usage behaviour as library or learning analytics is another key area of development. If we can connect the data we have about user visits to the library, book issues and resource downloads, activities in the virtual learning environment and in the classroom, we can produce a better understanding of learner behaviour to help customise services. Librarians could be at the forefront of mining this data to improve services.

Data: structured or unstructured?

Granted, this storm of interest in “data”, may disguise different usages of the term. Research data could be qualitative data, though they are perhaps most valuable and vulnerable when derived from data intensive science. TDM is concerned with text as unstructured data. Library and Learning analytics are based primarily on structured, log file data.

The ethical issues

At the same time our sensitivity to the ethical issues around data is rising. How can users be given appropriate control over their own data? What restrictions need to be placed on commercial companies’ use of data about our online behaviour? Can libraries themselves retain users’ trust while exploiting the benefits of learning data analysis for service improvement? There are also massive challenges around data preservation in all these contexts. The professional knowledge of librarians and archivists need to be translated to meet the challenges of data curation. Data literacy, as an aspect of information literacy, will also need to be part of librarians’ training offer.

All these trends suggest that our skills in managing, interpreting and visualising, and curating data, in ethical and legally safe ways, will be at the heart of our profession’s work in the next decades. One of our future stories is as a data profession.


Andrew Cox is a senior lecturer at the Information School, University of Sheffield and led the RDMRose Project. His research interests include virtual community, social media and library responses to technology. He coordinates Sheffield’s MSc in Digital Library Management.

You can follow Andrew on Twitter @iSchoolAndrew

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Exploring Research Data Management is an accessible introduction to RDM with engaging tasks for the reader to follow and build their knowledge. It will be useful reading for all students studying librarianship and information management, and librarians who are interested in learning more about RDM and developing Research Data Services in their own institution.

Find out more about the forthcoming book here



Pinfield, S., Cox, A.M., Rutter, S. (2017). Mapping the future of academic libraries: A report for SCONUL.


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Building Bridges

This guest post from Sara Mannheimer and Ryer Banta is about introducing undergraduates to the foundations of research data management through something everyone can relate to—organizing personal digital files. You can read more about their experience in The Complete Guide to Personal Digital Archiving which features their co-authored chapter, “Personal Digital Archiving as a Bridge to Research Data Management”

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In 2016, we were both working at Montana State University Library, but working in totally different divisions. Sara was the Data Management Librarian with a focus on research data management and data management planning for faculty and graduate students. Ryer was the Undergraduate Experience Librarian, focusing on information literacy instruction and support for undergraduate students. In many ways it would seem that we were living in very different parts of the library.

Although our jobs were quite different, we connected over our shared conviction that undergraduates would benefit from learning fundamental research data management skills. Undergraduates are entering a data-driven job market, where skills related to data management are in high demand. In industry, data scientists are working in a wide variety of sectors, and in academia, researchers are increasingly required to publish research data. Tailoring research data management lessons to undergraduates also served a key student population at MSU. Montana State University is a mid-sized university with about 16,500 total students, about 14,000 of whom are undergraduates. So we knew that there could be a big potential impact if we could figure out a meaningful way to help undergraduates build research data management skills.

As we began to think about creating a useful and meaningful research data management related lesson for undergraduates, our immediate challenge was figuring out how to get over the hurdle of making research data management relevant. Most undergraduates do not encounter research data on a regular basis, and we wanted to connect research data management to their daily life, their current schoolwork, or ideally both. The instructional principle of making lessons relevant may seem to be fairly common sense, but it is also supported by constructivist learning theory. We dipped our toes into this rich area of scholarship while developing our lesson, focusing on a couple of aspects of constructivist learning theory. For anyone developing learning experiences, we highly recommend dipping your toes, and even diving headlong, into constructivist learning theory and related theories.

Constructivist learning theory encompasses several principles, but we focused on the principles related to active, student-focused discovery. Two core tenets of constructivist learning theory specify that:

  • New learning builds on prior knowledge. By tapping into students’ past experiences, educators can create a learning sequence that extends from prior knowledge to the current lesson to a lifelong pattern of curiosity and learning.
  • Meaningful learning develops through “authentic” tasks. Activities conducted in class should simulate activities that students will use in their class assignments and in their real lives. This strategy ensures that the skills students learn in the classroom have direct relevance to their lives outside of the classroom.

Applying these tenets provided us with new insights about how to make research data management relevant for undergraduates. Given that new learning builds on prior knowledge, we aimed to understand students’ prior knowledge regarding data, tap into students’ past learning experiences, and then build upon that knowledge in the classroom. Given that meaningful learning develops through “authentic” tasks, we aimed to teach concrete, relatable skills that could be practiced both during instruction and afterwards. We wanted to position research data management skills in the context of students’ current lives, rather than promising a theoretical applicability to an abstract future career.

Taking a cue from constructivist learning theories, we realized that we could start with data that students already use and manage on a daily basis, specifically their digital files on their computers. At the same time, we also realized that many of the basic principles of research data management are also found in personal digital archiving practice. These dual realizations helped us focus our lesson on principles and practices that could be immediately applied to students’ digital files. In fact, in our lesson, we designed activities that got students started on reorganizing their files following personal digital archiving best practices. We organized our lesson into four key sections:

  • Set the stage. Students describe the use, importance, and challenges of data within their discipline or other personally relevant contexts. This step helps prepare students to apply the lesson to their own lives.
  • Basics of personal digital archiving. Students discover basic personal digital archiving strategies and principles that are also used to manage research data. This step provides a foundation of knowledge that informs in-class activities.
  • Apply learning with activities. Students apply personal digital archiving strategies and principles to organize and document their own files and data. This step provides students with hands-on experience with personal digital archiving strategies.
  • Debrief to connect personal digital archiving to research data management. Students reflect upon the value of the personal digital archiving principles and practices for their own personal data and discover the connection and similarities between personal digital archiving and research data management. This step allows students to process the lesson and consider future applications of the skills they learned.

We have had success with this lesson, and we have found that teaching personal digital archiving practices can act as a bridge that connects key practices of research data management to students’ everyday lives. Personal digital archiving builds on students’ prior knowledge of their digital belongings, and allows students to learn through authentic tasks that have immediate relevance to their daily lives. We hope that other librarians and educators can adapt and reuse the basic instructional strategies that we developed in their own learning contexts. Critical thinking about managing digital materials—whether personal files or research data—is a foundational skill that will benefit students during their undergraduate education and in their future careers.

Ryer Banta is the information literacy and technology librarian at Centralia College (WA), where he manages digital resources and services, and helps learners develop information literacy and lifelong learning skills. His research interests include open education, instructional design, educational technology, information literacy, and user experience.

You can follow Ryer on Twitter @RyerBanta

Sara Mannheimer is the data librarian at Montana State University in Bozeman, where she facilitates research data management and sharing, and promotes digital scholarship using library collections and “big data” sources. Her research focuses on data management practices, data discovery, digital preservation, and the social, ethical, and technical issues surrounding data-driven research.

You can follow Sara on Twitter @saramannheimer

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The Complete Guide to Personal Digital Archiving helps information professionals break down archival concepts and best practices into teachable solutions. Whether it’s an academic needing help preserving their scholarly records, a student developing their data literacy skills or someone backing up family photos and videos to protect against hard-drive failure, this book will show information professionals how to offer assistance.

Find out more about the book and read a sample chapter here.

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