In this post-truth world, can we still rely on archives to tell the truth?

Facet Publishing have announced the release of The Silence of the Archive by David Thomas, Simon Fowler and Valerie Johnson

 In recent years big data initiatives, not to mention Hollywood, the video game industry and countless other popular media, have reinforced and even glamorized the public image of the archive as the ultimate repository of facts and the hope of future generations for uncovering ‘what actually happened’. Chambers Cat 2.02.qxdThe reality is, however, that for all sorts of reasons the record may not have been preserved or survived in the archive. In fact, the record may never have even existed – its creation being as imagined as is its contents. And even if it does exist, it may be silent on the salient facts, or it may obfuscate, mislead or flat out lie.

The Silence of the Archive, written by three expert and knowledgeable archivists, with a foreword by Anne J. Gilliland, draws attention to the many limitations of archives and the inevitability of their having parameters.

Co-author David Thomas said,

In The Silence of the Archive, we explore the question of whether archives are all that they seem. Are there silences, omissions and falsehoods which undermine their truth claims? Are their holdings, as some of us were taught, the unselfconscious products of administrative processes, or are they the products of powers relations? Is there a democratic deficit in archives?

The book, part of the Principles and Practice in Records Management and Archives series, will make compelling reading for professional archivists, records managers and records creators, postgraduate and undergraduate students of history, archives, librarianship and information studies, as well as academics and other users of archives.

About the authors:

David Thomas is a Visiting Professor at the University of Northumbria. Previously, he worked at The National Archives where he was Director of Technology and was responsible for digital preservation and for providing access to digital material.

Simon Fowler is an Associate Teaching Fellow at the University of Dundee where he teaches a course on military archives. Previously he worked at The National Archives for nearly thirty years.

Dr Valerie Johnson is Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives. She has worked as an archivist and a historian in the academic, corporate and public sectors.

Contributors:

Anne J Gilliland is Professor, Department of Information Studies, Director, Center for Information as Evidence, University of California, USA.

​The series editor: Geoffrey Yeo is honorary researcher in archives and records management at University College London (UCL), London.

About the book:

The Silence of the Archive | May 2017 | 224pp
Paperback: 9781783301553 | Hardback: 9781783301560 | eBook: 9781783301577

Exercise your thinking skills to handle enquiries in any context

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the seventh edition of Tim Buckley Owen’s Successful Enquiry Answering Every Time.Chambers Cat 2.02.qxd

 When people want to satisfy their immediate curiosity they’re much more likely to use a search engine on their mobile device than ask their librarian. But while the days of personal intervention in this kind of enquiry are inevitably numbered, the professional skills that underpin them are not. This book uses technology as the enabler of the thought processes that information professionals need to engage in when answering enquiries, and makes the case that new technology, far from making them irrelevant, raises the skill stakes for all.

 Now in its seventh edition, the book is fully updated to cover new skills, such as employing critical thinking to manipulate, categorise and prioritise raw search results; using strategic reading and abstracting techniques to identify and summarise the essential information the enquirer needs from the retrieved documents; drawing on established story-telling practice to present research results effectively and working to the POWER model: plan, organise, write, edit, review.

Tim Buckley Owen said, “I’m delighted that generations of information professionals continue to find this book useful, amid the seismic changes that have taken place in library and information services since the first edition published in 1996. A lot of that must be because the book has never been technology-led. We now use the same tools as our users – so our job is to use those tools much more efficiently.”

Tim Buckley Owen BA DipLib MCLIP is an independent writer and trainer with over 40 years’ experience of information work – at Westminster Central Reference Library, the City Business Library, and as Principal Information Officer at the London Research Centre. He has also held strategic media and communications posts at CILIP, the Museums, Libraries & Archives Council and the Library & Information Commission.

Find out more about the book here: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=301935

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Copyright, privacy, makerspaces & more! – a preview of the CILIP Cymru Wales Conference

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The CILIP Cyrmu Wales Conference 2017 in Llandudno is three weeks away but places can only be booked until Thursday 4th May. Our pick of the sessions are below along with some useful resources from us to help you prepare for what is sure to be a memorable event.

More information about the programme can be found on the conference website

Here’s our pick of the sessions:

Keynote: Copyright Education and Librarians: understanding privileges and rights

Dr Jane Secker, co-author of Copyright and E-learning is presenting this keynote speech.

Useful resource

Jane’s recent blogpost: Copyright and e-learning: 6 tips for practitioners

Keynote: Protecting the privacy of library users

Paul Pedley, author of Practical Copyright for Library and Information Professionals, is presenting the other keynote on the last day of the conference.

Useful resource

Paul’s recent blogpost: The 2014 changes to copyright law were welcome, but there’s still unfinished business to attend to

Session: How we made a makerspace- and how you can too! 

Allie Cingi, Library Manager at Awen Cultural Trust  and Rob Jones, Library Assistant st Pencoed Library present this session on makerspaces; innovative DIY studios known as makerspaces where people can build, invent, share, and learn.

Useful resource

Ellyssa Kroski’s blog on 5 maker ideas for your library, taken from her book, The Makerspace Librarian’s Handbook

Session: Marketing to thrive and survive

In this session, Sian Nielson and Giles Lloyd-Brown explore how they’ve strengthened outreach and engagegement with students and disparate teams at Swansea University’s libraries.

Useful resource

A series of videos that Phil Bradley made to support his book Social Media for Creative Libraries

Session: Supporting evidence informed decision making for public health practice and policy

This session is presented by Katrina Hall, Team Lead, Knowledge Management, Observatory Evidence Service, Public Health Wales.

Useful resource

Sample chapter from Denise Koufogiannakis and Alison Brettle’s book Being Evidence Based in Library and Information Practice

Session: Planning for Disasters or Literally Firefighting?

In this session, Mark Ludlam, Learning Resources Manager at Gower College Swansea describes the experiences and lessons learned from the fire destroyed the college’s library service at the Tyoch Campus last year.

Useful resource

Sample chapter on emergency planning from Alison Cullingford’s The Special Collections Handbook.

Remember, bookings are only available until Thursday 4th May so book your place today!

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The workplace remains a ‘new frontier’ for those who research and think about Information Literacy

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Information Literacy in the 9781783301324Workplace, edited by Marc Forster with a foreword by Jane Secker

 In today’s information-driven workplace, information professionals must know when research evidence or relevant legal, business, personal or other information is required, how to find it, how to critique it and how to integrate it into their knowledge base. To fail to do so may result in defective and unethical practice which could have devastating consequences for clients or employers. There is an ethical requirement for information professionals to meet best practice standards to achieve the best outcome possible for the client. This demands highly focused and complex information searching, assessment and critiquing skills.

 Using a range of new perspectives from contributors including Christine S Bruce, Annemaree Lloyd, Bonnie Cheuk, Andrew Whitworth and Stéphane Goldstein, Information Literacy in the Workplace demonstrates several aspects of IL’s presence and role in the contemporary workplace, including IL’s role in assuring competent practice, its value to employers as a return on investment, and its function as an ethical safeguard in the duty and responsibilities professionals have to clients, students and employers.

Editor, Marc Forster said,

“This book includes new theories on how IL functions and manifests itself in the workplace; and new methods for developing IL in professional groups, and fostering information-literate workplaces. All of this should be of value to library and information professionals  and researchers as they attempt to survey the wide and complex workplace information horizon.”

Dr Marc Forster is a librarian at the University of West London, looking after the needs of the College of Nursing, Midwifery and Healthcare. His research interests include Information Literacy’s role in learning and in the performance of the professional role.

Contributors:

Jane Secker, Copyright and Digital Literacy and Chair of the CILIP Information Literacy Group

Christine S. Bruce, Professor, Information Systems School, Queensland University of Technology

Bonnie Cheuk, Executive, Euroclear

Stéphane Goldstein, Executive Director, InformAll

Annemaree Lloyd, Professor, Swedish School of Library and Information Science, University of Borås

Stephen Roberts, Associate Professor, Information Management, University of West London

Elham Sayyad Abdi, Associate Lecturer, Information Systems School, Queensland University of Technology

Mary M. Somerville, University Librarian for University of the Pacific Libraries in Sacramento, San Francisco, and Stockton, California, USA

Andrew Whitworth, Director of Teaching and Learning Strategy, Manchester Institute of Education, University of Manchester

 

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Cutting through the complexity of electronic resources management

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Alana Verminski and Kelly MBlanchett et al. Guide info lit 101.qxdarie Blanchat’s Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Management.

Electronic and digital resources are dynamic and ever-changing and there is an increasing demand for competent professionals to manage them. Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Management cuts through the complexity and serves as an invaluable introduction to those entering the field as well as a ready reference guide for current practitioners.

The authors said, “Electronic resources are a reality for libraries today, yet information professionals both experienced and new to the field face a steep learning curve when keeping up with the ever-evolving world of electronic resources management. This book aims to provide hands-on tools that can be used on the job, from beginning to end of the electronic resources lifecycle. It also provides information about the current marketplace and industry practices, putting the work of libraries into context with their external partners.”

The book covers:

  • the full range of purchasing options, from unbundling package subscriptions to pay per view
  • evaluating both new content and current resources
  • common clauses in licensing agreements and what they mean
  • selecting and managing open access resources
  • understanding methods of e-resources access authentication
  • using a triage approach to troubleshoot electronic resources access issues
  • the basic principles of usage statistics, and ways to use COUNTER reports when evaluating renewals
  • tips for activating targets in a knowledge base
  • marketing tools and techniques
  • clear explanations of jargon, important terms, and acronyms.

Alana Verminski is the collection development librarian at the Bailey/Howe Library at the University of Vermont.

Kelly Marie Blanchat is the electronic resources support librarian at Yale University Library.

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10 copyright conundrums clarified by Cornish

Graham Cornish, author of Copyright: Interpreting the law for libraries, archives and information services, provides this guest blogpost. All week we have been publishing blogs from the authors of our copyright books in the lead up to the CILIP Copyright Conference on Friday (tickets still available!).

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Image source: ‘Folklore NullElf: burning copyright’ by Flickr user Martin Fisch https://www.flickr.com/photos/marfis75/


Copyright: Interpreting the law for libraries, archives and information services
has been a first port of call for library and information staff for 27 years and is now in its 6th. edition. Often referred to as “Cornish on Copyright” it aims to be a one-stop reference tool to answer specific questions posed by readers, staff and anyone needing to copy or publish something. Deliberately designed as quick-reference tool, it avoids legal jargon and leading the user into the arcane underworld of the complexities of copyright law.Copyright, 6th edition

Copyright is a dynamic topic, despite the glazed look on some people’s faces when the word is mentioned and is at the heart of our profession. Like Janus, we look both ways: protecting the rights of the owner whilst maximizing access to information for our users. The consequence of this is that no book can be totally up-to-date and the law and its interpretation are changing all the time. Just as this edition went to press the High Court struck out a whole clause as the consultation on its content was deemed inadequate. We are still working out the implications of changes to the law relating to surface design of manufactured items. That hideous teapot that looks like an elephant and is your auntie’s pride and joy may suddenly have more significance in copyright terms that it did 12 months ago!

Here are the answers to ten tricky copyright questions taken from the book (which also contains the answers to 851 other copyright questions!).

Q1. Why is copyright so often ignored by users?

A. Because it is such an intangible thing, there is often a temptation to ignore it. Those who take this approach forget that they, too, own copyright in their own creations and would feel quite angry if this were abused by others.

Some of the restrictions placed on use by the law may seem petty or trivial but they are designed to allow some use of copyright material without unduly harming the interests of the creator (author). With the rapid growth of social networks, individuals are becoming more aware of the value of their creations such as photos and poems.

Q2. When does a work based on another work become original?

A. When sufficient time, effort, technical skills and knowledge have been used to make it reasonably clear the work is a new one and not merely a slavish copy.

Example: If you write your own poem about Jack and Jill, it is protected. If you simply reproduce the well known nursery rhyme with one or two minor changes, the reproduction is not original and not protected – but if you photocopy or scan the poem the typographical arrangement may be protected.

Q3. Who owns the copyright in children’s work in schools?

A. Despite the general myth that it is owned by the school, the child who creates anything in school owns the rights in it and it cannot be used for any purpose without the child’s (or guardian’s) permission.

Q4. What is the difference between a literary and a dramatic work?

A. A dramatic work is the non-spoken part of a presentation, which gives instructions as to how the play is to be executed. The words of a dramatic work are protected as a literary work. The term ‘dramatic work’ also covers choreography, dance and mime.

Example: A show like West Side Story has separate copyrights in the words (literary work), the choreography and the directions (dramatic work) and the music (musical work).

Q5. Who owns the copyright in a collection of images?

A. Each image has its own copyright just like the articles in a periodical. However, there will also be a copyright in a compilation made up of images. It may also be a database depending on the way the collection is put together.

Q6. Who owns the content of a sound recording?

A. It is very important to distinguish between the copyright in the sound recording and the copyright in the material recorded.

Example: A recording of a song by the Beatles has all sorts of copyrights – the song, the music, the arrangement and the performance. In addition, there is a copyright in the actual sound recording, which is quite separate.

Q7. Is it permitted to show films and DVDs in libraries?

It is permitted only if they are viewed by one person at a time through dedicated terminals where others cannot watch at the same time. Showing them to groups, even for educational or children’s use, requires a licence either from the Motion Picture Licensing Corporation (MPLC) or Filmbank.

Q8. Who is the author of a database?

A. Apart from the fairly rare occasion when a database has a personal author, the author is defined as the maker of the database. The maker of a database is the person who takes the initiative in obtaining, verifying or presenting the contents of the database and assumes the risk of investing in those actions and therefore obtains the database right.

Makers cannot qualify for this right unless they are individuals with EEA nationality, or companies/organizations incorporated within the EEA, or partnerships or unincorporated bodies formed under the law of an EEA state.

Q9. Is all material on the web copyright?

A. Probably. To be safe, behave with material on the web as if it were in paper form. If you would not copy or distribute it in paper form, then do not do so in electronic form, unless the owner specifically states this can be done, which many website owners do.

Q10. Who owns the copyright in a work bequeathed to a library or archive?

A. There is a special additional exception for unpublished works. When an author leaves unpublished manuscripts or other materials of which they are the author to a library, archive or museum as a bequest, and their will does not specify any other arrangements, the presumption is that the copyright is also transferred to the library, archive or museum.

They may specify differently in the will; if they do, this will affect the way the unpublished material can be used. If the work is deposited by the author during their lifetime or deposited by the family but copyright is not assigned to the library or archive, then copyright remains with the author or their heirs and successors.

The author is always keen to hear from users of the book and additional information that could usefully be included.

Graham P Cornish

Graham@copyrightcircle.co.uk

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Copyright and e-learning: 6 tips for practitioners

facet-copyright-classics

This guest post from Jane Secker and Chris Morrison originally appeared on the CILIP blog last year to coincide with the publication of the second edition of Copyright and E-learning: a guide for practitioners.

We are re-publishing the blog now in the lead up to the CILIP Copyright Conference on Friday 7th April at which both Jane and Chris are speaking.

About the book

The book covers copyright law and its relationship to e-learning or onCopyright and E-learning, 2nd editionline learning. It is designed to be read by practitioners and so it tries to offer pragmatic advice on a range of topics issues from digitising orphan works, to lecture recordings, the use of social media and MOOCs. We tried to write the book in a jargon-free easily digestible way, to hopefully make it a practical guide for learning technologists, but also teachers, lecturers and other learning support staff in higher education, schools, further education and even in a workplace learning setting, where online learning is used extensively.

Six tips for practitioners

We’ve taken six key ideas from the book’s conclusion, which we feel are really important to helping you approach any copyright issue:

1. Everything is about risk

Realize that everything is about risk and there are ways of mitigating the risk. For example, devising helpful and timely education and training programmes, but also having institutional policies such as notice and takedown policies on the VLE or any online platform where content can be shared. You will need to decide how comfortable you (and your institution) are towards risk if you decide to rely on copyright exceptions, or are not sure whether a licence covers what you wish to do.

2. Break down any copyright query into its constituent parts

Break down any copyright query into its constituent parts – what type of copyright works does it concern, how will they be used, are there any licences that might apply and finally could a copyright exception come into play? This inevitably requires developing your own technical knowledge to tackle these queries and we’ve provided numerous examples of further resources and training that might help you in the book.

3. Use empathy

Use empathy – in any given situation understanding what someone is actually trying to do when they approach you with a copyright query is helpful. However empathy is important from both sides so try to get the person to think about what the creators and rights holders of a work had in mind too. Ideally this will help you put your copyright support work in context and frame it as a collaborative enterprise.

4. Understand that there is lots of great ‘stuff’ available for free

Understand that there is lots of great ‘stuff’ available for free or under liberal licence terms, such as Creative Commons. Many people are happy to share their work with you provided they are credited, particularly when it’s for educational use, but recognize that there are often good reasons why some content costs money or is not available to you.

5. Recognize that good manners go a long way

Recognize that good manners go a long way – asking nicely, giving credit and building creative networks are a fundamental component of education and research. Over time you can build up your network of contacts, and often knowing the right person to ask will give you access to a wider network of resources which can be used at little or no cost.

6. Remember, you are not alone

Remember, you are not alone. It’s easy, particularly if you are faced with a tricky copyright situation to feel you are expected to know all the answers and this clearly isn’t going to be possible and no one is an island. So build up your support network, both within your organization and externally, and get to know a few copyright experts who can help you out when you get stuck!

Find out more

If you’d like to find out more about the book you can visit our website where we have made the list of further resources available. You can also find out about some of the copyright education initiatives we’d been involved in recently. If you are interested in hearing more about some of the challenges related to copyright and e-learning, you may also wish to listen to the recent podcast we recorded with James Clay. We also plan to make the sixth chapter from the book, on copyright education, available on open access.

About the authors

Since the book was published in June 2016 Jane and Chris have been busy. Jane started a new job at City, University of London after Easter as Senior Lecturer in Educational Development and Chris is completing his Postgraduate diploma in Copyright Law at Kings College London. Jane and Chris are presenting at the CILIP Copyright Conference, Jane is keynoting at CILIP Wales in May 2017 and both Jane and Chris are keynoting at CILIP Scotland conference in June in Dundee. They will be speaking about their research into librarians experiences of copyright in their professional lives.

Work is also continuing apace to develop educational games for copyright education. Copyright the Card Game is being adapted for US law and a prototype of the game has been produced by Paul Bond a librarian at University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown campus. There is also work being undertaken to develop an Irish and Canadian version of the game. Chris and Jane are also demonstrating a prototype of their new game, The Publishing Trap, at LILAC 2017 on 10-12 April in Swansea. This game was the runner-up in the Lagadothon games competition and is aimed at early career researchers to help them understand the choices they make about scholarly communication and sharing their research.

What are the main copyright challenges you face? Let us know in the comments

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