Category: Academic Libraries

New edition of the essential textbook for collection development and management in libraries

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the fourth edition of Peggy Johnson’s Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management.

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Peggy Johnson has revised and fully updated this textbook to provide a timely and valuable new resource for LIS students and professionals. Each chapter offers complete introductory coverage of one aspect of collection development and management, before including numerous suggestions for further reading and study. A range of practical case studies are included to illustrate and explore all of the issues discussed.

Johnson said,

The twenty-first century has brought into question the role and value of collection development as a professional specialty. The shift from collections-centered to services-centered libraries, patron-driven acquisitions, consortial buying, serial bundles, aggregator e-book packages, mass digitizing projects, ubiquitous access to digital content, and the growth of open access can raise uncertainties about what a collections librarian’s responsibilities might be. Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management is based on the premise that the collections librarian’s role in this complex and evolving environment is now more important than ever.

This book will be useful as a comprehensive introduction and learning tool for LIS students, a timely update for experienced librarians with new collection development and management responsibilities, and a handy reference resource for practitioners as they go about their day-to-day work.

Technical Services Quarterly declared that the previous edition of the book,

must now be considered the essential textbook for collection development and management…the first place to go for reliable and informative advice.

The CILIP Rare Books Newsletter described it as,

an excellent summary of vital areas of collections development and management, which can also act as a guide to those navigating this challenging area of the profession in such times of rapid change.

Peggy Johnson has published several books, including ALA Editions’ Developing and Managing Electronic Collections: The Essentials, edited the peer-reviewed journal Library Resources & Technical Services for more than nine years and continues to edit Technicalities: Information Forum for the Technical Services Professional. She teaches as an adjunct professor in the MLIS program at St. Catherine University and received the ALCTS Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

 

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The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship wins Art Libraries Society Award

Facet Publishing is pleased to announce that The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship has won the ARLIS/NA Worldwide Books Award for Publications.

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The second edition of The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship was awarded the Worldwide Books Award for Publications at the 46th Annual Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) conference in New York last week.

Editors Paul Glassman and Judy Dyki said,

“We are thrilled that the Handbook was selected by ARLIS/NA for this award since it represents the scholarly research and writing of many Society members and other contributors. It is an honour to receive this recognition from this dynamic professional organization.”

 The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship integrates theory and practice to offer guidelines for materials and collections management, reviews best practice in teaching and learning and presents innovative approaches to knowledge creation, library spaces, promotion and sustainability for information professionals working in art and design environments who need to support and anticipate the information needs of artists, designers, architects and the historians who study those disciplines.

The Worldwide Books Award for Publications recognizes outstanding publications by ARLIS/NA Individual members in librarianship or visual resources curatorship, and the arts. By recognizing special achievement in these areas the Award acknowledges and encourages scholarly publication by the ARLIS/NA membership.

Find out more about the book, including a free sample chapter here.

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Love Data Week 2018 Roundup

Last week Facet participated in Love Data Week, a 5-day online international event ‘to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services.’ We asked our authors  to share their data stories and each responded with a different approach. You’ll find a summary of each post published during the week below.

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David Haynes, author of brand new Metadata for Information Management and Retrieval, 2nd edition, began the week with an exploration of the ethical implications for metadata gathering and uses in his post Metadata – have we got the ethics right?

Next up, Selena Killick, co-author of the forthcoming Putting Library Assessment Data to Work, explained how library data can be used to measure student success in Data is the new oil

Sara Mannheimer and Ryer Banta, co-contributors to The Complete Guide to Personal Digital Archiving, shared their data success story in Building Bridges – in which they offer advice for introducing students to research data management skills through something everyone can relate to—organizing personal digital files.

Bringing the week to a close Andrew Cox, co-author of the forthcoming Exploring Research Data Management, took a look at the future for academic libraries in The Growing Importance of Data in Academic Libraries

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New research on the architecture, design and evaluation of online information systems and services

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the second book in the iResearch series, Information Systems: Process and practice, edited by Christine Urquhart, Dr Faten Hamad, Dr Dina Tbaishat  and Alison Yeoman

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Design and evaluation of information systems and services have remained an area of study and research in many disciplines ranging from computing and information systems, information and library studies, to business management. Each discipline aims to address a set of unique challenges as they are seen from their disciplinary background and perspectives. This results in research that often fails to take a holistic view of information systems including technologies, people and context. This second title in the iResearch series addresses this challenge by bringing together different viewpoints and perspectives of information systems design and evaluation from the contributors’ own diverse and yet complimentary areas of teaching and research interests.

Co-editor Christine Urquhart said, “This book attempts to bridge some of the gaps between discrete areas of research that information professionals could use to design helpful and effective information systems and services.  Our aim is to provide a critical analysis, with supporting case studies of library and information service and systems architecture – in a very broad interpretation of the term architecture”.

The book will be essential reading for researchers in information science, specifically in the areas of digital libraries, information architecture and information systems. It will also be useful for practitioners and students in these areas seeking to understand research issues and challenges and to discover how they have been handled in practice elsewhere.

iResearch series editor G G Chowdhury said,

‘This is not just another book on information architecture that focuses on content architecture alone; the research and development activities reported in this book also cover the other end of the spectrum concerned with service evaluation, performance management and library assessment. The 14 chapters in this book, written by academics and researchers from different research backgrounds and viewpoints, offer a significant contribution to research and practices in the architecture, design and evaluation of online information systems and services.’

About the authors

Christine Urquhart was a full-time member of staff in the Department of Information Studies, Aberystwyth University. Since retiring from full-time teaching she has continued to pursue her research interests.

Dr Faten Hamad is an Assistant Professor in the Library and Information Science Department, University of Jordan.

Dr Dina Tbaishat is an Assistant Professor at the University of Jordan, Library and Information Science Department.

Alison Yeoman was formerly a Research Officer in the Department of Information Studies, Aberystwyth University and is now an independent researcher.

With contributions from: Sally Burford, Catherine M. Burns, Karen Colbron, Adam Euerby, Fernando Loizides, Aekaterini Mavri, Paula Ormandy and Cristina Vasilica.

 

For more information about the book and to read a sample chapter click here

 

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The Growing Importance of Data in Academic Libraries

Guest post by Andrew Cox, co-author of the forthcoming book, Exploring Research Data Management

In a globalising world the future is complicated. It is not simply a matter of new trends impacting library work in clearly defined ways. Rather change seems to be impacting our work in complex ways. In a recent report on the future of academic libraries (Pinfield, Cox and Rutter, 2017) we sought to address this complexity by proposing that we think in terms of nexuses of change. Two major ones we identified were:

  • “The dataification of research” -combining trends such as open access, open science, text and data mining, artificial intelligence and machine learning, the internet of things, digital humanities and academic social networking services, and
  • “Connected learning” -incorporating changing pedagogies, learning analytics, students as customers, social media, mobile computing, maker spaces and blurring of space uses.

A story that seems to be threaded through these changes is the growing importance of data.

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Photo by Joshua Sortino on Unsplash

Research data management

Thus one aspect of change in research practice is the way that the valued outputs of research are increasingly not confined to written outputs, but also seen to lie in the underlying research data. If made discoverable and useable these data can be the foundation for new research. Research Data Management is the emergent set of professional practices that supports this emphasis. Librarians have had a big part in how this story has unfolded.

Text Data Mining

Another data related change in research is the way that texts in the library are increasingly to be seen as data for Text and Data Mining (TDM). When there are literally hundreds of thousands of research papers on a topic, a manually conducted “comprehensive literature review” becomes an impossibility. Rather we will need the help of text mining algorithms that seek out patterns in the corpus of texts. It is libraries that are seeking to create the legal and technical infrastructure in which TDM can be carried out.

Learner Analytics

Learning is also undergoing a data revolution. Usage behaviour as library or learning analytics is another key area of development. If we can connect the data we have about user visits to the library, book issues and resource downloads, activities in the virtual learning environment and in the classroom, we can produce a better understanding of learner behaviour to help customise services. Librarians could be at the forefront of mining this data to improve services.

Data: structured or unstructured?

Granted, this storm of interest in “data”, may disguise different usages of the term. Research data could be qualitative data, though they are perhaps most valuable and vulnerable when derived from data intensive science. TDM is concerned with text as unstructured data. Library and Learning analytics are based primarily on structured, log file data.

The ethical issues

At the same time our sensitivity to the ethical issues around data is rising. How can users be given appropriate control over their own data? What restrictions need to be placed on commercial companies’ use of data about our online behaviour? Can libraries themselves retain users’ trust while exploiting the benefits of learning data analysis for service improvement? There are also massive challenges around data preservation in all these contexts. The professional knowledge of librarians and archivists need to be translated to meet the challenges of data curation. Data literacy, as an aspect of information literacy, will also need to be part of librarians’ training offer.

All these trends suggest that our skills in managing, interpreting and visualising, and curating data, in ethical and legally safe ways, will be at the heart of our profession’s work in the next decades. One of our future stories is as a data profession.

 

Andrew Cox is a senior lecturer at the Information School, University of Sheffield and led the RDMRose Project. His research interests include virtual community, social media and library responses to technology. He coordinates Sheffield’s MSc in Digital Library Management.

You can follow Andrew on Twitter @iSchoolAndrew

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Exploring Research Data Management is an accessible introduction to RDM with engaging tasks for the reader to follow and build their knowledge. It will be useful reading for all students studying librarianship and information management, and librarians who are interested in learning more about RDM and developing Research Data Services in their own institution.

Find out more about the forthcoming book here

 

References

Pinfield, S., Cox, A.M., Rutter, S. (2017). Mapping the future of academic libraries: A report for SCONUL. https://sconul.ac.uk/publication/mapping-the-future-of-academic-libraries

 

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