Category: Library Technology

Take your library users beyond Google to trustworthy scholarly resources

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the second edition of Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources by Marie R. Kennedy and Cheryl LaGuardia.

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As every frontline librarian knows, if library users really knew and understood how many resources are made available to them online, they wouldn’t go to alternative information providers to do their research. Online library systems don’t make e-resources very accessible nor does simply making users aware of resources solve the problem given the number of resources available so getting the word out effectively means creating strategic marketing programmes.

Newly expanded and updated, the second edition of Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources demonstrates how to design and implement marketing plans that will help librarians save time, effort, and money while increasing the use of library e-resources. The book includes guides to writing, implementing, assessing, and updating library marketing plans and features case studies from seven academic and public libraries

The authors said,

“Libraries are acquiring enormously valuable and significantly expensive electronic databases for researchers, but those researchers may not even be aware of them. Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources aims to bridge the awareness gap between the library and its user, taking them well beyond the limitations of Google to the heady delights of trustworthy, vetted scholarly resources.”

Marie R. Kennedy is a librarian at Loyola Marymount University, where she coordinates serials and electronic resources. She has written and presented widely on the development and use of electronic resource management systems. Marie also writes the Organization Monkey blog about organization and librarianship. She is the co-director of the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (http://irdlonline.org).

Cheryl LaGuardia
is a research librarian at Widener Library, Harvard University. She writes the Not Dead Yet blog and eReviews for Library Journal, edits the library selection tool, Magazines For Libraries™ and writes the Magazines For Libraries™ Update blog, and has published a number of books, including Becoming a Library Teacher; Finding Common Ground: Creating the Library of the Future without Diminishing the Library of the Past; and Teaching the New Library. She received the Isadore Gilbert Mudge Award from the American Library Association in 2016.

 

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New guide to data-driven decision-making for library improvement

Facet Publishing have announced the publication of Library Improvement through Data Analytics by Lesley S. J. Farmer and Alan M. Safer.Farmer & Safer_FACET COVER_04

This book shows how to make sense of data in libraries and use it to inform decision making at every level.

Sound data analytics is the foundation for making an evidence-based case for libraries, in addition to guiding myriad organizational decisions, from optimizing operations for efficiency to responding to community needs. Designed to be useful for beginners as well as those with a background in data, this book introduces the basics of a six point framework that can be applied to a variety of library settings for effective system based, data-driven management.

The guide covers such key topics as:

  • the basics of statistical concepts
  • recommended data sources for various library functions and processes, and guidance for using census, university, or chamber of comm
    erce data in analysis
  • techniques for cleaning data
  • matching data to appropriate data analysis methods
  • how to make descriptive statistics more powerful by spotlighting relationships
  • 14 case studies which address such areas as digitization, e-book collection development and reference
  • staffing, facilities, and instruction.

This book’s clear, concise coverage will enable readers of every experience level to gain a better understanding of statistics in order to facilitate library improvement. It will be essential reading for library managers and key decision makers.

More information: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=301614

Interpret, understand and teach the ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Facet Publishing have announced the publication of Teaching Information Literacy Reframed: 50+ framework-based exercises for creating information-literate learners by Joanna M BurkBurkhardt_FACET COVER_01.jpghardt.

This book offers a starting point to understanding and applying teaching practices to the six threshold concepts listed in the Association for College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, an altogether new way of looking at information literacy.

Bestselling author and expert instructional librarian Burkhardt decodes the Framework, putting its conceptual approach into straightforward language and offering more than 50 classroom-ready Framework-based exercises.

Each chapter focuses on one of the six concepts and offers sample exercises that can be applied in single lecture periods or over semester-long courses. The book offers best practices in creating learning outcomes, assessments, and teaching tricks and tips. Finally, it offers perspectives on how learning, memory, and transfer of learning applies to the teaching of information literacy.

This book will assist librarians in teaching information literacy and enable their students to cross the threshold and become information literacy experts.

How information creation, capture, preservation and discovery are being transformed

Is Digital Different? focuses on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the Moss & E-P Is digital different COVER REVISEDinformation landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago. The very existence of the traditional library and archive is being challenged as more resources become available online and computers and supporting networks become increasingly powerful.

The book draws on examples of the impact of other new and emerging technologies on the information sciences in the past and emphasises that information systems have always been shaped by available technologies that have transformed the creation, capture, preservation and discovery of content.  It is edited by Michael Moss, Professor of Archiva
l Science at the University of Northumbria and Barbara Endicott-Popovsky, Executive Director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity at the University of Washington,

Key topics covered include:

  • Search in the digital environment
  • RDF and the semantic web
  • Crowd sourcing and engagement between institutions and individuals
  • Development of information management systems
  • Security: managing online risk
  • Long term curation and preservation
  • Rights and the Commons
  • Finding archived records in the digital age.

Is Digital Different? illustrates the ways in which the digital environment has the potential to transform scholarship and break down barriers between the academy and the wider community, and draws out both the inherent challenges and the opportunities for information professionals globally.

This book will be of particular to students, particularly those on information studies programs, and academics, researchers and archivists globally.

A sample chapter is available on the Facet website.

Is Digital Different?; September 2015; paperback; 224pp; 9781856048545; £49.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.