Category: Press Release

Why does any organisation need a Chief Data Officer?

Facet Publishing are pleased to announce the release of The Chief Data Officer’s Playbook by Caroline Carruthers, Group Director for Data Management, The Lowell Group and Peter Jackson, Chief Data Officer, Southern Water.

Playbook

Most organisations now accept that data is a fundamental asset but the rapidly evolving role of Chief Data Officer (CDO) is still a mystery to many. Caroline Carruthers and Peter Jackson, two practicing CDOs, unlock these mysteries for the first time in The Chief Data Officers Playbook.

The book is a jargon-free guide for CDOs looking to understand their position better and for aspiring CDOs looking to take the next step in their career. It will also be valuable for chief executives, directors and business leaders needing to understand the value that a CDO can bring to an organisation, what they do, how to recruit one, where they should sit in the organisation and who they should report to.

The authors said,

“Data is a fast-moving and evolving environment and we get the sense that the pace of change is getting faster every month, perhaps every week. Our book is packed with strategies, tools and results of our real-life experiences which can help you leapfrog some of the mistakes we have made and learn from where it went well for us”.

The book begins by explaining why organisations need a CDO before moving on to cover key topics including, what you should do in your first 100 days as a CDO, building your team, how to break the data hoarding mentality, data and information ethics, delivering a data strategy in the context of business as usual, and how to recruit a CDO.

David Mathison, Chairman, CEO and Founder of the CDO Club, said,

“The release of this book is perfectly timed. The CDO Club tracks CDO hires globally, and last year alone the number of new CDO hires quintupled. The Chief Data Officer’s Playbookis a compendium of essential knowledge anyone operating in the current data environment must have”.

The book is available from Amazon and the eBook is available from eBooks.com

Follow the book on LinkedIn for updates and additional content

Browse a free sample chapter on the Facet Publishing website (click on the book’s cover)

Read an in-depth review of the book by Matt Corey, MD of Change Force here

Advertisements

Art and design librarians of the world, read on, you have nothing to lose but your innocence

The second edition of The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship edited by Paul Glassman and Judy Dyki is out now.

Copy of Hamilton & Saunderson

Since the publication of the first edition of this handbook, the world of art and design libraries has been rocked by rapid advances in technology, an explosion in social media, the release of new standards and guidelines, shifts in the materials and processes of contemporary art, innovative developments in publishing models, expanding roles of librarians, new perspectives surrounding library spaces, and the evolving needs and expectations of art and design students.

Revised and updated with mostly new chapters, The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship provides an accessible guide to librarians working in art and design environments who need to support and anticipate the information needs of artists, designers, architects and historians who study those disciplines.

The authors said,

“The handbook delineates roles and responsibilities for art and design librarians, offers guidelines for materials and collections management, reviews best practice in teaching and learning, and presents innovative approaches to knowledge creation, library spaces and promotion and sustainability.”

Clive Phillpot, former Director of the Library at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, said,

“The contributors to this book are writing from the front line. So, art and design librarians of the world, read on, you have nothing to lose but your innocence.”

The book is out now and will be essential reading for students taking library and information science courses in art librarianship, special collections, and archives, as well as practising library and information professionals in art and design school libraries, art museum libraries and public libraries.

Paul Glassman is Director of University Libraries and Adjunct Instructor of Architectural History and Design at Yeshiva University.

 Judy Dyki is Director of Library and Academic Resources at Cranbrook Academy of Art and Editor of Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America.

Foreword by Clive Phillpot, Fermley Press, London (formerly Director of the Library, Museum of Modern Art, New York).

The book is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD. It is available in North America from the American Library Association.

Sign up to our mailing list to hear more about new and forthcoming books. Plus, receive an introductory 30% off a book of your choice – just fill in your details below and we’ll be in touch to help you redeem this special discount:*

 

*Offer not available to customers from USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Asia-Pacific

Take your library users beyond Google to trustworthy scholarly resources

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the second edition of Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources by Marie R. Kennedy and Cheryl LaGuardia.

9781783302673.jpg

As every frontline librarian knows, if library users really knew and understood how many resources are made available to them online, they wouldn’t go to alternative information providers to do their research. Online library systems don’t make e-resources very accessible nor does simply making users aware of resources solve the problem given the number of resources available so getting the word out effectively means creating strategic marketing programmes.

Newly expanded and updated, the second edition of Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources demonstrates how to design and implement marketing plans that will help librarians save time, effort, and money while increasing the use of library e-resources. The book includes guides to writing, implementing, assessing, and updating library marketing plans and features case studies from seven academic and public libraries

The authors said,

“Libraries are acquiring enormously valuable and significantly expensive electronic databases for researchers, but those researchers may not even be aware of them. Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources aims to bridge the awareness gap between the library and its user, taking them well beyond the limitations of Google to the heady delights of trustworthy, vetted scholarly resources.”

Marie R. Kennedy is a librarian at Loyola Marymount University, where she coordinates serials and electronic resources. She has written and presented widely on the development and use of electronic resource management systems. Marie also writes the Organization Monkey blog about organization and librarianship. She is the co-director of the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (http://irdlonline.org).

Cheryl LaGuardia
is a research librarian at Widener Library, Harvard University. She writes the Not Dead Yet blog and eReviews for Library Journal, edits the library selection tool, Magazines For Libraries™ and writes the Magazines For Libraries™ Update blog, and has published a number of books, including Becoming a Library Teacher; Finding Common Ground: Creating the Library of the Future without Diminishing the Library of the Past; and Teaching the New Library. She received the Isadore Gilbert Mudge Award from the American Library Association in 2016.

 

Making the case for open licensing in cultural heritage institutions

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Open Licensing for Cultural Heritage by Gill Hamilton and Fred Saunderson.

9781783301850

In the digital era, libraries, archives, museums and galleries are no longer constrained by the physical limitations of their buildings, analogue books, manuscripts, maps, paintings and artefacts. Cultural collections now can be safely distributed and shared globally. To ensure that the benefits of this ability to share are realised, cultural institutions must endeavour to provide free and open access to their digital collections. The tool for achieving this is open licensing.

Featuring real-world case studies from diverse education and heritage organizations, Open Licensing for Cultural Heritage digs into the concept of ‘open’ in relation to intellectual property. It explores the organizational benefits of open licensing and the open movement, including the importance of content discoverability, arguments for wider collections impact and access, the practical benefits of simplicity and scalability, and more ethical and principled arguments related to the protection of public content and the public domain.

The authors said,

“Openly sharing our knowledge, experience, content and culture for free is not a new concept. Sharing is an innate and natural part of our human character. Forward looking, inclusive, modern, relevant cultural heritage organizations must play a central role in supporting free, open access to culture at a global level. This is possible, practical and achievable with considered and informed application of an open licensing framework. Our book will provide readers with the insight, knowledge, and confidence to make a case for and implement an open licensing approach.”

Gill Hamilton is Digital Access Manager at the National Library of Scotland where she leads on access to the Library’s extensive digital collections, and oversees its resource discovery and library management systems.

Fred Saunderson is the National Library of Scotland’s Intellectual Property Specialist where he has responsibility for providing copyright and intellectual property advice and guidance, as well as coordinating licensing and re-use procedures.

 

Sign up to our mailing list to hear more about new and forthcoming books. Plus, receive an introductory 30% off a book of your choice – just fill in your details below and we’ll be in touch to help you redeem this special discount:*

 

*Offer not available to customers from USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Asia-Pacific

How can we make information literacy really matter to learners?

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Learner-centred Pedagogy: Principles and practice by Kevin Michael Klipfel and Dani Brecher Cook

Layout 1

More than ever, librarians are required to possess pedagogical expertise and are being called upon to design, implement, and assess robust evidence-based reference and instructional practices that contribute to student success. In order to achieve this, librarians must know how to teach information literacy skills that go far beyond one particular library context to facilitate lifelong learning. In addition to the traditional information expertise of the library professional, today’s librarian must also master evidence-based pedagogical practices that can help make learning stick.

Learner-centred Pedagogy offers librarians concrete strategies to connect with learners at all levels. The book covers cognitive principles for organizing information literacy instruction, how to establish rapport and build learners’ motivation, questions to keep in mind for inspiring autonomous learning, the science behind information overload, and a balanced framework for evaluating specific educational technology tools.

Klipfel and Cook said, “Our goal in this book is to introduce readers to a practical, evidence-based vision of learner-centred pedagogy that helps learners develop the skills required to use information to think well about what matters to them. We hope that librarians, after reading Learner-centred Pedagogy, will feel more prepared for the changing job market’s increased focus on evidence-based instruction, have more confidence in adapting their skills to the robust teaching and learning environments of today’s libraries, and be well-prepared to facilitate learning environments that result in lifelong learning.”

Kevin Michael Klipfel received his master’s degree in philosophy from Virginia Tech. He received his M.S.L.S. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where his master’s research on authenticity, motivation, and information literacy learning won the Dean’s Achievement Award for the Best Master’s paper of 2013 in the School of Information in Library Science. He has presented nationally on student motivation and learning both in and outside the library profession, and has published articles on the application of humanistic and existential psychology to learner-centred information literacy learning in journals such as College &Research Libraries and Reference Services Review. He lives and works in Los Angeles.

Dani Brecher Cook is Director of Teaching and Learning at University of California, Riverside. She holds an MSLS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an A.B. in English Literature from the University of Chicago. She has published on information literacy pedagogy and learning technologies in College & Research Libraries News, Reference & User Services Quarterly, and Communications in Information Literacy. Dani has presented on the intersection of these two topics nationally at conferences such as ACRL, LITA, LOEX, and the Library Technology Conference.

More information: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=301553

Sign up to our mailing list to hear more about new and forthcoming books. Plus, receive an introductory 30% off a book of your choice – just fill in your details below and we’ll be in touch to help you redeem this special discount:*

*Offer not available to customers from USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Asia-Pacific

A practical guide to project management for library and information professionals

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Barbara Allan’s new book, The No-nonsense Guide to Project Management.

Chambers Cat 2.02.qxd

Project work is widespread across the library and information sector ranging from small-scale and local such as introducing family history workshops within public library services, or large complex schemes, such as developing shared services across a number of libraries. Simple projects may be led by an individual working alone or in a small team whilst complex activities may involve people from other professions and may be managed by a team of professional project managers.

The No-nonsense Guide to Project Management completely revises and updates the author’s classic 2004 book Project Management to incorporate recent developments including; the evolution and wide-scale acceptance of formal project management methodologies; the use of social media to communicate information about projects; the use of crowdfunding and crowdsourcing to develop and maintain projects and the large shift in the types of project library and information workers may be involved in.

Barbara Allan said, “This book provides a pragmatic guide to managing many different types of projects and using common project management tools and techniques. International case studies will help the reader to understand the practical realities of managing projects whether they are an individual working in a voluntary organisation on an extremely limited budget or someone involved in a large-scale international project”.

Barbara Allan is an author and trainer. Her background includes managing workplace and academic libraries. She has spent many years working in business schools where her focus was on enhancing learning, teaching and the student experience, and the internationalization and employability agendas. Her qualifications include a doctorate in education (on the topic of e-mentoring and women into leadership). She is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship in 2008. Barbara is a Member of CILIP and the author of several Facet Publishing titles including, Emerging Strategies for Supporting Student Learning (2016), The No-nonsense Guide to Training in Libraries (2013), Supporting Research Students (2009) Project Management (2004) Supervising and Leading Teams in ILS (2006) and Blended Learning (2007).

Sign up to our mailing list to hear more about new and forthcoming books. Plus, receive an introductory 30% off a book of your choice – just fill in your details below and we’ll be in touch to help you redeem this special discount:*

*Offer not available to customers from USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Asia-Pacific

Practical guidance for valuing objects in cultural collections

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Freda Matassa’s new book Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives

Assigning a financial value to a cultural object is always difficult, as there is no right answer. It is one of the many tasks of the curator, whether they work in a gallery, museum, archive or library, yet it is a role for which few have had any traChambers Cat 2.02.qxdining and that many approach with a lack of confidence. Even if there is a profound knowledge of the subject matter, there may be insufficient experience in the market for cultural objects. However, although it may not be easy, it has to be done.

In Valuing Your Collection, collections management expert Freda Matassa examines the issues around valuing objects in cultural collections, describing current practice in museums, libraries and archives, and giving practical advice on how to assign values. Matassa looks at the difference between value and worth and at how cultural value can be translated into monetary terms. She outlines the arguments over whether financial values should be assigned at all and provides guidance on how to approach a valuation by making comparisons and using a step-by-step process for which templates for a wide range of collections are provided.

Matassa said,

Valuation is fraught with difficulties for cultural collections. Finance is not their core business. Curators have little or no training and are reluctant to mention money as it may detract from significance. My book is designed to give the non-specialist confidence in their decision making.

Freda Matassa FRSA MA (Hons) DipAL DipEd is a well-known UK expert on collections management who advises, teaches and lectures internationally. Currently Director of Matassa Toffolo, a museum-standard art consultancy, former Head of Collections Management at Tate Galleries and co-founder of the European Registrars Conference, she is expert adviser on several European projects for museum standards and to the Minister of Culture on Immunity from Seizure. She was named one of the Top 50 Women to Watch in the arts and is the author of Museum Collections Management (Facet, 2011) and Organizing Exhibitions (Facet, 2014).

Sign up to our mailing list to hear more about new and forthcoming books. Plus, receive an introductory 30% off a book of your choice – just fill in your details below and we’ll be in touch to help you redeem this special discount:*

*Offer not available to customers from USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Asia-Pacific