Category: Press Release

Practical guide on new methods and technologies involved in systematic searching

9781783303731.jpgFacet Publishing announces the publication of Systematic Searching: Practical ideas for improving results edited by Paul Levay and Jenny Craven.

In resource-poor, cost-saving times practical advice on new methods and technologies for information professionals on how to search more efficiently is needed.

Systematic Searching: Practical ideas for improving results brings together expert international practitioners and researchers to highlight the latest thinking on systematic searching. Beginning by looking at the role of the information specialist as an expert searcher, the book then examines the current challenges and the potential solutions to more effective searching in detail. The book​ blends theory and practice and takes into account several different approaches to information retrieval and information-seeking behaviour with special focus being given to searching for complex topics in a health-related environment. It does not presume an in-depth prior knowledge or experience of systematic searching and includes case studies, practical examples and ideas for further research and reading.

Divided into three parts, the book covers: theoretical approaches to evidence synthesis and the implications that these have for the search process; new technologies for retrieving evidence and how these are leading to new directions in information retrieval and evidence synthesis; the future of information specialists as expert searchers and how information professionals can develop their skills in searching, communication and collaboration to find new roles.

Carol Lefebvre, Independent Information Consultant and Co-Convenor of the Cochrane Information Retrieval Methods Group, said ‘Paul Levay and Jenny Craven have amassed, as editors of this book, an impressive, international array of information specialists and librarians together with other information retrieval experts and methodologists from academia, evidence synthesis organizations, libraries and elsewhere with considerable but diverse experience and expertise in systematic searching.’

Paul Levay is an Information Specialist at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). His research interests are in developing search methods to support Health Technology Assessments and public health guidelines. He has previously held posts at the National Police Library and the Greater London Authority. Paul is a chartered member of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Jenny Craven is an Information Specialist at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Previously, Jenny worked at the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM) at Manchester Metropolitan University; she worked on practical information related projects, with a particular focus on improving access to information for people with visual impairments. During this time she was on the standing committee of the IFLA libraries serving persons with disabilities group, and ran a series of workshops in developing countries for the FORCE Foundation charity on providing accessible library services. Her role at NICE involves supporting the information needs for a variety of programmes across NICE. She also works on internal projects to improve service delivery, the evaluation of information skills training, and to explore methods for the effective retrieval of information. She is the editor of two previous Facet Publishing books, Web Accessibility: Practical advice for the library and information professional (2008) and Access, Delivery, Performance: The future of libraries without walls (2009).

Advertisements

Comprehensive guide to freedom of information and its management

Layout 1Facet Publishing announce the publication of The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook by Paul Gibbons.

Freedom of information (FOI) is now an international phenomenon with over 100 countries from Albania to Zimbabwe enacting the right to know for their citizens. Since 2005, the UK’s Freedom of Information Act has opened up thousands of public bodies to unparalleled scrutiny and prompted further moves to transparency.

The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook is a comprehensive guide to FOI and its management. It is designed to be an indispensable tool for FOI Officers and their colleagues. It includes:

  • a guide to the UK’s FOI Act, the right to know and the exemptions
  • clear analysis of the most important case law and its implications for the handling of FOI requests
  • pointers to the best resources to help FOI officers in their work
  • explanations of how FOI interacts with other legislation, including detailed explorations of the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 and how the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation impacts on FOI
  • a look at requirements to proactively publish information and the effect of copyright and re-use laws on FOI and open data
  • comparisons of the UK’s Act with FOI legislation in other jurisdictions from Scotland to South Africa
  • an exploration of the role of the FOI Officer: who they are, what they do, their career development and what makes them effective
  • suggestions on how to embed FOI within an organisation using effective procedures, technology and training
  • a stage-by-stage guide to processing requests for information.

Jon Baines, Data Protection Advisor at Mischon de Reya LLP said ‘Several years ago Paul Gibbons ‘outed’ himself as ‘FOIMan’– until that point an anonymous commentator on Freedom of Information, and subject of much speculation as to his identity. Since then Paul has established himself as one of the leading experts in the field. I’m delighted he has now cemented this position with the first book which really meets the needs of and challenges facing FOI practitioners. Paul has an easy and approachable writing style, but a formidable knowledge and rigorous research lie behind that.’

Paul Gibbons is an independent consultant and trainer specialising in information rights. He is best known for his FOIMan blog which he began writing in 2010 reflecting on his own experiences of implementing FOI in three very different public authorities: the Greater London Authority, an NHS Trust in south-east London and SOAS, a college of the University of London. Before getting involved in FOI, Paul completed a Masters in Archives Administration at Aberystwyth University, going on to work for many years as a records manager in the pharmaceutical industry, local government and in the Houses of Parliament. He was later awarded an LLM with distinction in Information Rights, Law and Practice by the University of Northumbria.

Find out more about the book here.

Stay up-to-date with all the latest books from Facet by signing up to our mailing list

Valuable insight into social tagging as a form of linked data

Facet Publishing announce the release of Social Tagging in a Linked Data Environment, edited by Dr Diane Rasmussen Pennington and Dr Louise Spiteri

jj-ying-215308-unsplash

Social tagging (including hashtags) is used over platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, WordPress, Tumblr and YouTube across countries and cultures meaning that one single hashtag can link information from a variety of resources. Social Tagging in a Linked Data Environment explores social tagging as a potential form of linked data and shows how it can provide an increasingly important way to categorise and store information resources.

Shawne D. Miksa, Associate Professor at the University of North Texas said,

“Pennington and Spiteri have pulled together a kaleidoscope of scenarios that explore the role and evolution of social tagging. From traditional library discovery systems and recommender systems to ontologies for dementia, effects on public policy to cognitive authority in Facebook communities, to Web 2.0, Web 3.0, and beyond. Tagging and linking—two words that imply so much more than what they say—provide the core for this work. A valuable collection for anyone wanting to explore the possibilities of letting people have their say through the simple act of contributing their own words.”

The book will be essential reading for practicing library and information professionals involved in electronic access to collections, including cataloguers, system developers, information architects and web developers. It will also be useful for students taking programmes in library and Information science, information management, computer science, and information architecture.

Brian O’Connor, Professor at the University of North Texas said,

“Pennington, Spiteri, and their thoughtful contributing authors give us a thesaurus, a treasure chest of concepts, constructs, and tools for building new means of navigating constellations of people authoring, publishing, and looking for information. How do we find useful information? How do we bring information to the point of use? How do we determine veracity and cognitive authority of information? Who is now to link what with whom? Here the reader will find much to use and much to ponder”.

Find out more about the book here

About the authors:9781783303380

Diane Rasmussen Pennington is a Lecturer in Information Science at the University of Strathclyde. Diane worked as a corporate IT professional and then a systems librarian before becoming a full-time academic in 2005. Diane’s PhD dissertation focused on social tagging practices of photojournalism professionals, and tagging has remained as a central focus of her research. Diane served as the Association for Information Science & Technology’s Social Media Manager from 2014-2016.

Louise Spiteri is Associate Professor at the School of Information Management, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Louise’s areas of research interest focus on social tagging, user-generated metadata, discovery systems, classification systems, and taxonomies. Louise’s most recent research has focused on the creation of taxonomies for affect, based on an analysis of user-generated reviews and content in public library catalogue records.

A wide-ranging overview of how the shift to digital is changing the landscape of archives

Layout 1Facet Publishing announce the publication of Digital Archives:Management, use and access edited by Milena Dobreva.

Today, accessibility to digital content is continuing to expand rapidly and all organizations which collect, preserve and provide access to the collective memory of humankind are expected to provide digital services. Does this transition into digital space require a substantial shift in the professional philosophy, knowledge and practice of archives?

This edited collection attempts to explore these uncharted territories by bringing together inspirational and informative chapters from international experts to help readers understand the drivers for change and their implications for archives. Editor Milena Dobreva said,

“I hope the book will broaden and deepen the thinking and dialogue between all those academics, professionals and students who are working on different aspects of the digital cultural and scientific heritage”.

Reassessment of the role of archives in the digital environment serves to develop critical approaches to current trends in the broader heritage sector, including cultural industries experimenting with sustainable business models for cultural production, digitization of analogue cultural heritage, and the related IPR issues surrounding the re-use of digital objects and data for research, education, advocacy and art.

Professor Kalpana Shankar said,

“Archives and access continue to matter, perhaps more than ever. As digital material proliferates and the tools to manipulate it do so as well, what is real and what is false online become difficult to disambiguate. Human rights, scientific research and ‘wicked’ geopolitical problems (and solving them) rests on accurate and universal access to records and data, whether one is talking about the international crises of forced migration and refugees, human rights, political corruption or climate change. The work of this book is in helping us, the reader, understand how archives and archivists navigate the entanglement of technical, social, organizational and legal challenges they face daily”.

Dr. Milena Dobreva is an Associate Professor at UCL Qatar where she is coordinating the MA in Library and Information Studies leading the introduction of four pathways in the programme including a specialisation on Archives, Records and Data Management. Previously she served as a Head of the Department of Library Information and Archive Sciences at the University of Malta spearheading the redesign and expansion of the departmental portfolio, and as the Founding Head of the first Digitisation Centre in Bulgaria where she was also a member on the Executive Board of the National Commission of UNESCO. Milena is a member of the editorial board of the IFLA Journal, and of the International Journal on Digital Libraries (IJDL) and is the co-editor of User Studies for Digital Library Development (Facet, 2012).

Contributors
Carla Basili, Italian National Research Council and Sapienza University; Pierluigi Feliciati, University of Macerata; Edel Jennings, Waterford Institute of Technology; Enrico Natale, University of Basel; Gillian Oliver, Monash University; Elli Papadopoulou,  European Open Science Cloud pilot project; Oleksandr Pastukhov, University of Malta; Guy Pessach, Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Trudy Huskamp Peterson, archival consultant and certified archivist; Panayiota Polydoratou, Alexander Technological Educational Institute (ATEI) of Thessaloniki; Kalpana Shankar, University College Dublin; Sotirios Sismanis, information professional; Donald Tabone, Middlesex University, Malta.

Stay up-to-date with all the latest books from Facet by signing up to our mailing list

New edition of the go-to reference for students and RIM professionals

9781783304301.jpgFacet Publishing announce the publication of Records and Information Management, 2nd edition by Patricia C Franks.

The first edition of Records and Information Management was described by Archives and Records as, ‘a valuable up to date combined textbook and reference book which will enhance its readers’ knowledge irrespective of their place on the career ladder’.  Since its publication in 2013, the records and information field has evolved considerably with the growth of the internet of things; the extreme volume and variety of data produced more quickly than ever; the increased necessity of employing technology to categorize, analyze, and make use of the data; the recognition of the value of information assets; and the emergence of new business models that leverage the power of algorithms to manipulate data.

The new second edition cements this work’s status as an up-to-date classic, with its content updated and expanded to address emerging technologies, most notably blockchain and evolving standards and practices. Franks presents complete coverage of the records and information lifecycle model, encompassing paper, electronic (databases, office suites, email), and new media records (blogs, chat messages, and software as a service). Informed by an advisory board of experts in the field and with contributions by noted authorities, the text addresses such key topics as the origins and development of records and information; the discipline of information governance and developing a strategic records management plan; creation/capture and classification; retention strategies, inactive records management, archives, and long-term preservation; access, storage, and retrieval; electronic records and electronic records management systems; the latest on rapidly evolving technologies such as web records, social media, and mobile devices; vital records, disaster preparedness and recovery, and business continuity; monitoring, auditing, and risk management; and education and training.

Patricia C Franks said,

‘The breadth of knowledge expected of the successful records professional continues to expand. It now includes the need to better understand not only the business process but also the goals of the organization from a business perspective…this book, therefore, differs from traditional records management works by placing equal emphasis on business operations out of which records arise and the ways in which the records professional can contribute to the core mission of the enterprise beyond the lifecycle management of records.’

The book’s authoritative blend of theory and practice makes it a matchless resource for everyone in the archives and records management field, including archivists, records managers, and information managers, regardless of their job title (e.g. digital archivist, knowledge management advisor, information governance specialist).

Patricia C Franks is an associate Professor in the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at San Jos̩ State University in California, where she serves as the Master of Archives and Records Administration (MARA) Program Coordinator and the SLIS Internship Program Coordinator. Dr. Franks supervises virtual interns and teaches courses related to information organizations and management, archival studies, and records management. Her professional activities include working with ARMA International, most recently as Consensus Group Leader for both ANSI/ARMA 1-2011 Implications of Web-Based, Collaborative Technologies in Records Management and ARMA TR 21-2012 Using Social Media in Organizations.

Stay up-to-date with all the latest books from Facet by signing up to our mailing list

New book imagines the archive of the future

Chambers Cat 2.02.qxdFacet Publishing announce the publication of Archival Futures edited by Caroline Brown.

It is widely acknowledged that the archival discipline is facing a time of change. The digital world has presented changes in how records are created, used, stored and communicated. At the same time, there is increased public debate over issues such as ownership of and access to information and its authenticity and reliability in a networked and interconnected world.

Archival Futures draws on the contributions of a range of international experts to consider the current archival landscape and imagine the archive of the future. Firmly rooted in current professional debate and scholarship, the book offers thought provoking and accessible chapters that aim to challenge and inspire archivists globally and to encourage debate about their futures. Chapters cover the role of archives in relation to individuals, organisations, communities and society; how appraisal, arrangement, description and access might be affected in the future; changing societal expectations in terms of access to information, how information is exchanged, and how things are recorded and remembered; the impact of new technologies, including blockchain and automation; the place of traditional archives and what ‘the archive’ is or might become; the future role of the archive profession; and archives as authentic and reliable evidence

Tom Nesmith (University of Manitoba), said

‘Archives play a unique and powerful role in making the past available for an extraordinary array of current purposes. But do archives have a future, particularly given disruptive changes in communication technologies? Archival Futures addresses this and other challenges to find ways forward for the now pivotal role of archives in society.’

The book will appeal to an international audience of students, academics and practitioners in archival science, records management, and library and information science.

Caroline Brown is Programme Leader for the archives programmes at the Centre for Archive and Information Studies at the University of Dundee where she is also University Archivist.. She is a Chair of Archives and Records Association (UK & Ireland’s) Conference Committee, sits on its Professional Development Committee, having formerly served as the Chair of the Education, Training and Development Committee, and is a member of the Executive Committee for ARA Scotland. She is a sits on the Section Bureau of the International Council on Archives Section on Archival Education and is active in ICA/SUV . She is an Arts and Humanities Research Council Peer Review College and Panel Member and has written and spoken on a range of archival and recordkeeping issues. She is the editor of Archives and Recordkeeping: Theory into practice (Facet, 2013).

Contributors
Jenny Bunn, University College London; Luciana Duranti, University of British Columbia; Joanne Evans, Monash University; Craig Gauld, University of Dundee; Victoria Lemieux, University of British Columbia; Michael Moss, Northumbria University; Gillian Oliver, Monash University; Sonia Ranade, The National Archives; Barbara Reed, consultant; Kate Theimer, writer, speaker and commentator; David Thomas, Northumbria University; Frank Upward, Monash University; Geoffrey Yeo University College London.

 

Stay up-to-date with all the latest books from Facet by signing up to our mailing list

New bibliotherapy guide to support the health and wellbeing of communities

9781783303410.jpgFacet Publishing announce the publication of Sarah McNicol and Liz Brewster’s Bibliotherapy.

The basic premise of bibliotherapy is that information, guidance, wellbeing and solace can be found through reading. This new book draws on the latest international practical and theoretical developments in bibliotherapy to explore how librarians, healthcare providers and arts organizations can best support the health and wellbeing of their communities.

The book begins with an exploration of the history and theory of bibliotherapy. It then presents a series of case studies illustrating how particular approaches can be used across different settings. A key focus of the book is methods of offering bibliotherapy for diverse audiences, such as homeless populations, psychiatric patients, non-native speakers and people living with dementia. Case studies are international in scope to reflect the spread of initiatives with examples from the UK, North and South America and Australasia.

Bob Usherwood, Professor Emeritus at The University of Sheffield said,

‘Sarah McNicol and Liz Brewster clearly appreciate and articulate the importance of theory, the significance of research and the value of books and reading. They, and international  contributors, demonstrate compassion and creativity and illustrate how research can be translated into policy and practice. This life-affirming text is essential reading not only for those concerned with bibliotherapy but for all who believe in the value and potential of library services in the modern world.’

This book will be useful reading for students; practising library and information professionals across sectors, including health, public, and academic libraries; healthcare providers and those with an interest in wellbeing more generally.

Sarah McNicol is a Research Associate at the Education and Social Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University. She has worked as an Information Studies researcher since 2000 and she previously worked as a school librarian. At present, much of her research is focused around the use of graphic comics and novels to explore a range of issues, in particular health and wellbeing.

Liz Brewster is a Lecturer at Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster University. Her research focuses on experiences of mental health and wellbeing, particularly how creative activities such as reading may affect mental health. She has previously worked in academic and public libraries.

Contributors
Natalia Tukhareli, Fiona Bailey, Susan McLaine, Elizabeth Mackenzie, David Chamberlain, Cristina Deberti Martins, Rosie May Walworth, Kate Gielgud, Elena Azadbakht and Tracy Englert.