Category: Records Management

New edition of the essential textbook for collection development and management in libraries

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the fourth edition of Peggy Johnson’s Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management.

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Peggy Johnson has revised and fully updated this textbook to provide a timely and valuable new resource for LIS students and professionals. Each chapter offers complete introductory coverage of one aspect of collection development and management, before including numerous suggestions for further reading and study. A range of practical case studies are included to illustrate and explore all of the issues discussed.

Johnson said,

The twenty-first century has brought into question the role and value of collection development as a professional specialty. The shift from collections-centered to services-centered libraries, patron-driven acquisitions, consortial buying, serial bundles, aggregator e-book packages, mass digitizing projects, ubiquitous access to digital content, and the growth of open access can raise uncertainties about what a collections librarian’s responsibilities might be. Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management is based on the premise that the collections librarian’s role in this complex and evolving environment is now more important than ever.

This book will be useful as a comprehensive introduction and learning tool for LIS students, a timely update for experienced librarians with new collection development and management responsibilities, and a handy reference resource for practitioners as they go about their day-to-day work.

Technical Services Quarterly declared that the previous edition of the book,

must now be considered the essential textbook for collection development and management…the first place to go for reliable and informative advice.

The CILIP Rare Books Newsletter described it as,

an excellent summary of vital areas of collections development and management, which can also act as a guide to those navigating this challenging area of the profession in such times of rapid change.

Peggy Johnson has published several books, including ALA Editions’ Developing and Managing Electronic Collections: The Essentials, edited the peer-reviewed journal Library Resources & Technical Services for more than nine years and continues to edit Technicalities: Information Forum for the Technical Services Professional. She teaches as an adjunct professor in the MLIS program at St. Catherine University and received the ALCTS Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

 

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The ‘why-to’ as well as the ‘how-to’ textbook for archivists

 Facet Publishing have announced the release of the second edition of Laura 9781783302062A Millar’s Archives: Principles and practices

Originally published in 2010, the second edition of the Waldo Gifford Leland Award-winning textbook, Archives: Principles and practices, has been extensively revised to address the impact of digital technologies on records and archives.

Written in clear language with lively examples, the book introduces core archival concepts, explains best-practice approaches and discusses the central activities that archivists need to understand to ensure the documentary materials in their charge are cared for as effectively as possible.

Author, Laura A Millar said,

Archivists search, sometimes in vain, for a balance between abstract theory and traditional practice, both of which can become increasingly arcane or impractical over time. My book seeks to strike a balance between principles and practices. It is as much a ‘why-to’ book as a ‘how-to’ book.

Part of the Principles and Practice in Records Management and Archives series, this book will be essential reading for archival practitioners, archival studies students and professors, librarians, museum curators, local authorities, small governments, public libraries, community museums, corporations, associations and other agencies with archival responsibility.

Laura A. Millar is an independent consultant in the fields of records, archives and information management, publishing and education. She has taught records, archives and information management courses in universities and colleges in Canada and internationally and is the author of dozens of books and articles on a range of topics. In 2010, the first edition of Archives: Principles and practices was awarded the prestigious Waldo Gifford Leland Award from the Society of American Archivists in recognition of its ‘superior excellence and usefulness in the fields of archival history, theory, or practice.’

More information about the book: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=302062

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In this post-truth world, can we still rely on archives to tell the truth?

Facet Publishing have announced the release of The Silence of the Archive by David Thomas, Simon Fowler and Valerie Johnson

 In recent years big data initiatives, not to mention Hollywood, the video game industry and countless other popular media, have reinforced and even glamorized the public image of the archive as the ultimate repository of facts and the hope of future generations for uncovering ‘what actually happened’. Chambers Cat 2.02.qxdThe reality is, however, that for all sorts of reasons the record may not have been preserved or survived in the archive. In fact, the record may never have even existed – its creation being as imagined as is its contents. And even if it does exist, it may be silent on the salient facts, or it may obfuscate, mislead or flat out lie.

The Silence of the Archive, written by three expert and knowledgeable archivists, with a foreword by Anne J. Gilliland, draws attention to the many limitations of archives and the inevitability of their having parameters.

Co-author David Thomas said,

In The Silence of the Archive, we explore the question of whether archives are all that they seem. Are there silences, omissions and falsehoods which undermine their truth claims? Are their holdings, as some of us were taught, the unselfconscious products of administrative processes, or are they the products of powers relations? Is there a democratic deficit in archives?

The book, part of the Principles and Practice in Records Management and Archives series, will make compelling reading for professional archivists, records managers and records creators, postgraduate and undergraduate students of history, archives, librarianship and information studies, as well as academics and other users of archives.

About the authors:

David Thomas is a Visiting Professor at the University of Northumbria. Previously, he worked at The National Archives where he was Director of Technology and was responsible for digital preservation and for providing access to digital material.

Simon Fowler is an Associate Teaching Fellow at the University of Dundee where he teaches a course on military archives. Previously he worked at The National Archives for nearly thirty years.

Dr Valerie Johnson is Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives. She has worked as an archivist and a historian in the academic, corporate and public sectors.

Contributors:

Anne J Gilliland is Professor, Department of Information Studies, Director, Center for Information as Evidence, University of California, USA.

​The series editor: Geoffrey Yeo is honorary researcher in archives and records management at University College London (UCL), London.

About the book:

The Silence of the Archive | May 2017 | 224pp
Paperback: 9781783301553 | Hardback: 9781783301560 | eBook: 9781783301577

Five ways to love your data

Guest post by Gillian Oliver, co-author of Digital Curation, 2nd edition

As with any love story with a happy ending, a successful relationship with data will take effort and commitment.  Here are five practical ways to ensure the course of true love runs smoothly:

1. Data by design

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Image source: DATA by flickr user Janet McKnight

Unlike human relationships you can specify your ideal characteristics and so make sure you’re working from the best possible starting point. It’s never too early to begin design, project planning should incorporate awareness of data requirements from the perspectives of the stakeholders involved. If you need convincing, remember that up-front awareness and being proactive will greatly assist in reducing the overall costs involved in data curation. The types of features to think about are likely to include choices relating to open or proprietary file formats, metadata schema and workflows, naming conventions and storage requirements.

2. Learn from others

Learn from others. Don’t try to go it alone – there’s a wealth of experience out there and much of it is freely accessible to make use of.  Here are just two examples of websites which can be mined for practical advice:  The Digital Preservation Coalition contains many useful reports, especially the Technology Watch series.  The Digital Curation Centre has an astonishing wealth of content, ranging from basic explanations of core definitions to very practical tools and guidance.

3. Don’t try to reinvent the wheel

This is further emphasising the point above, which can’t be repeated often enough.  There are many standards available, such as the Open Archival Information System standard which provides ahigh level conceptual model for digital archives, or the Dublin Core schema for descriptive metadata. These standards have been developed by international and cross-disciplinary communities, and are subject to ongoing review.

data-scrabble-turned

Image source: data (scrabble) by Flickr user justgrimes

4. Don’t be a loner, get out and socialise

There are plenty of opportunities to collaborate and work together with people grappling with the same problems which can only enrich your relationship with your data. Sharing your knowledge will help continue to build and grow the worldwide community of practice. Socialising can be face to face, if you’re fortunate enough to be able to take advantages of the many conferences, workshops and events that take place around the world, or online. The Open Preservation Foundation provides a central hub for tools, advice and knowledge exchange – particularly useful are the blogs which provide insight into current activities, both successes and failures.

5. Never give up

Good relationships can be established at a much later stage, unappreciated and unloved data need not be rejected if there are signs that there is potential for a fulfilling and positive future. But you will need specialist advice if you need to go down this track.  BitCurator provides a gateway to digital forensics tools and methods in the cultural heritage context. Brown Dog is a project that seeks to bring the long tail of data into the light – the focus of their efforts is past and present uncurated data.

So, what are you waiting for?  Love your data, starting today!

Gillian Oliver is Associate Professor at Monash University and the co-author of Digital Curation, 2nd edition (Facet 2016) and Records Management and Information Culture (Facet 2014), the co-editor of Engaging with Records and Archives (Facet 2016) and a Co-editor in Chief of the journal Archival Science.

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Addled by archives? Rattled by recordkeeping? Help for librarians is here at last

Chambers Cat 2.02.qxdThe No-nonsense Guide to Archives and Recordkeeping is ideal for professionals involved in the management of archives and records, especially if they are just starting out or without formal training.

The book covers all aspects of recordkeeping and archives management. It follows the records’ journey from creation, through the application of classification and access techniques, evaluation for business, legal and historical value and finally to destruction or preservation and access in the archive.

Based on the internationally renowned training days run by the author and her business partner, the book deals with records and archives in all formats. It utilizes checklists, practical exercises, sample documentation, case studies and helpful diagrams to ensure a very accessible and pragmatic approach, allowing anyone to get to grips with the basics quickly.

The book is divided into four main work areas:

  • current records: including creation, filing, classification and security
  • records management: including aims, risks, planning, preparation and delivery
  • archives management: including collecting policies, intellectual property rights, appraisal, digitization and outreach
  • archival preservation: including policy, disaster prevention and repositories.

Author Margaret Crockett said, “managing records and archives is really interesting and rewarding but it is also really important: if we can’t tame our paper and digital mountains into manageable documentation which tells the story of our lives, our organisations and our societies we cannot prove the things we need to prove and lose our memory of the past. My book aims to set out clearly all you need to know to understand the basic principles and concepts which underpin this often underestimated but crucial activity”.

More information: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=048552#.VlRCwXbhDcs

Sample chapter: http://www.booksonix.co.uk/facetpublishing/9781856048552.pdf