Category: Uncategorized

Entry-level guidance for managing born-digital content

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Heather Ryan and Walker Sampson’s The No-nonsense Guide to Born-digital Content.

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Libraries and archives of all sizes are collecting and managing an increasing proportion of digital content. Within this body of digital content is a growing pool of ‘born-digital’ content: content that has been created and has often existed solely in digital form. The No-nonsense Guide to Born-digital Content explains step by step processes for developing and implementing born-digital content workflows in library and archive settings and includes a range of case studies collected from small, medium and large institutions internationally.

Authors Heather Ryan and Walker Sampson said,

Our book is for librarians and archivists who have found themselves managing or are planning to manage born-digital content and who may feel somewhat unsure of their ability to take on a task that by all appearances demands a high level of technological expertise

The book covers the basics of digital information; selection, acquisition, accessioning and ingest; description, preservation and access; methods for designing and implementing workflows for born-digital collection processing; and strategies and philosophies to move forward as technologies change.

Trevor Owens, Head of Digital Content Management at the Library of Congress said,

Librarians, archivists and museum professionals need to collectively move away from thinking about digital, and in particular born-digital, as being niche topics for specialists. If our institutions are to meet the mounting challenges of serving the cultural memory functions of an increasingly digital-first society the institutions themselves need to transition to become digital-first themselves. We can’t just keep hiring a handful of people with the word ‘digital’ in their job titles. You don’t go to a digital doctor to get someone who uses computing as part of their medical practice, and we can’t expect that the digital archivists are the ones who will be the people who do digital things in archives. The things this book covers are things that all cultural heritage professionals need to get up to speed on.

Heather Ryan is the Director of Special Collections, Archives & Preservation and Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries. She earned her PhD in Information and Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Walker Sampson is the Digital Archivist at the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries. He earned his MS in Information Science at the University of Texas at Austin before beginning work at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History in 2011.

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Our new catalogue is out now

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Our new catalogue, featuring all our new and forthcoming titles as well as bestsellers and key backlist, is out now.

Download a PDF of the catalogue here

Browse the catalogue online here

If you would like a printed copy, send an email to info@facetpublishing.co.uk and we will post one out to you.

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International Digital Preservation Day Roundup

Last Thursday was the first ever International Digital Preservation Day. People from all around the world came together to celebrate the collections preserved, the access maintained and the understanding fostered by preserving digital materials.

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CC image credit: ‘Preservation Park’ by Flickr user torbakhopper

Throughout the day we shared some free chapters from some of our digital preservation books which we have gathered below in one handy reference post.

  1. An extract from Adrian Brown’s DPC Preservation Award-Winning book Practical Digital Preservation
  2. Digital preservation strategies for visualizations and simulations – a free chapter from Preserving Complex Digital Objects by Janet Anderson, Hugh Denard and William Kilbride
  3. Digitization in the context of collection management – a free chapter from Anna E Bulow and Jess Ahmon’s Preparing Collections for Digitization.

Finally, it didn’t quite make it in time for IDPD17, but Brianna Marshall’s The Complete Guide to Personal Digital Archiving is out today.

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Global Media and Information Literacy Week Roundup

Today marks the end of Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2017. The theme for this year’s event was Media and Information Literacy in Critical Times: Re-imagining Ways of Learning and Information Environments. Throughout the week Facet participated by sharing ‘look inside’ previews from our information literacy books, guest blog posts and video posts from our authors. We have gathered all of those resources together in one handy reference post below.

 

‘Look inside’ chapter previews

‘Decoding the Framework for Information Literacy’ by Joanna M Burkhardt from Teaching Information Literacy Reframed

‘Learning within for beyond: exploring a workplace Information Literacy design’ by Annemaree Lloyd from Information Literacy in the Workplace

The Introduction to Trudi E Jacobson and Thomas P Mackey’s Metaliteracy in Practice

‘Interpret and Analyze Images’ by Nicole E. Brown, Kaila Bussert, Denise Hattwig
and Ann Medaille from Visual Literacy for Libraries

 

Blog & video posts from Facet authors

Nicole E. Brown and Kaila Bussert shared a step-by-step exercise which could be incorporated into information literacy teaching to develop student’s visual literacy skills in their blog post Develop Your Visual Literacy

Trudi E. Jacobson and Thomas P. Mackey explored ways to advance critical thinking and learning in today’s world with their blog post Advancing Metaliteracy

Sarah McNicol asked Why should critical literacy matter to information professionals?

Joanna M. Burkhardt offered 6 suggestions for teaching information literacy

Phil Bradley’s short video navigates social media with A Guide for Checking Authority and Validity

Tim Buckley Owen showed us ways in which library and information professionals can learn from journalist’s techniques in his blog post Spotlight on Spotlight: What can library and information professionals learn from journalists?

 

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Why should critical literacy matter to information professionals?

Critical literacy is an approach to learning and teaching that has gathered momentum in recent years as it has become widely used in classrooms around the world. Critical literacy is not just important for formal education settings however. It is also relevant for libraries because it is an approach that can engage students (or other users) in more active forms of reading and more creative ways of critiquing texts, as well as equipping them with skills and strategies to challenge social and political systems.

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What is critical literacy?

Critical literacy differs from most models of information literacy because it is not simply about the ability to evaluate information for features such as authenticity, quality, relevance, accuracy, currency, value, credibility and potential bias. Instead, it addresses more fundamental questions about the nature of knowledge.

One way of describing critical literacy is as a process that, ‘challenges the status quo in an effort to discover alternative paths for self and social development’ (Shor, 1999). This description highlights two key components of critical literacy. Firstly, it has a focus on practical action and community engagement. Secondly, critical literacy is concerned with the social and cultural contexts in which traditional, digital, multimedia and other types of texts are both created and read. Critical literacy is not about studying texts in isolation, but developing an understanding of the cultural, ideological and sociolinguistic contexts in which they are created and read. It involves an explicit commitment to equity, social justice and inclusion.

Authors and readers

A fundamental notion of critical literacy is that all texts are constructed(by one or more authors) and serve particular interests or purposes. As texts are written or created by people, who all have their own views of the world, no text is completely neutral and objective. For example, when they write, an author makes conscious and unconscious choices about what to include and exclude and how to represent the things or people they depict.

However, it is not just the author who has an important role. Just like authors, all readers have their own experiences and knowledge whichthey bring to a text. This means that each person interprets a text differently and multiple ways of reading a single text are not just possible, but inevitable. In contrast to more conventional approaches to resource evaluation, with critical literacy there is no single ‘correct’ way to read and respond to a text.

This means that critical literacy can allow students to move beyond merely retelling information to become actively engaged with texts as they start to exercise their power as readers to interrogate what is written and question the ideological standpoint of the author to form their own interpretations. Critical literacy also helps students to see connections between texts they read and the ‘real world’ as they come to realise how the experiences and opinions of both the author and reader are integral in shaping any text.

Some practical examples

Critical literacy is a theory that is highly relevant to the practical work of library and information workers across all sectors including academic, schools, public, workplace, prisons and health. In the case of public libraries, it can support social inclusion activities and offer alternative ways of framing reading promotion. In healthcare settings, critical literacy approaches can empower patients and challenge stigma. When working with young offenders, or at-risk young people, critical literacy can help to improve decision-making skills. In schools, it can have a role both within subjects such as Communication studies and in extra-curricular activities. It can also enhance the school librarian’s role within the school as they become engage in debates around the use of new media and academic honesty. When working with both undergraduate and post-graduate university students, critical literacy can move the librarian’s contribution to the learning process far beyond the simplistic database demonstration session to a more active, questioning approach that can profoundly impact on how students interact with information. Critical literacy can also support librarians’ work with particular user groups. For example, in the case of international students, disabled users; or adult learners, critical literacy can help to reframe difference as an asset rather than a deficit.

There is no doubt that adopting a critical literacy approach in a library setting can be highly challenging. Teaching students that there is no single ‘correct’ way to read a text and that evaluating a resource is not a process which can be reduce to a simple checklist requires considerable time, skill and confidence. However, the potential benefits can be immense.

These are just some brief examples of the ways in which critical literacy can be used within libraries and information services. Is your library using (or planning to use) critical literacy approaches in any way? If so, please let us know.

Critical Literacy for Information Professionals, edited by Sarah McNicol, provides a foundation of critical literacy theory, as applied to libraries, combines theory and practice to explore critical literacy in relation to different user groups, and offers practical ways to introduce critical literacy approaches in libraries.

Sarah McNicol is a research associate at the Education and Social Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.

This blog post originally appeared on the CILIP blog in March 2016. You can view the original post here: https://www.cilip.org.uk/blog/why-should-critical-literacy-matter-information-professionals