Tagged: archival science

Think differently about how we understand, interpret and interact with archives and records

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Engaging with Records and Archives: Histories and theories9781783301584

Engaging with Records and Archives showcases the myriad ways in which archival ideas and practices are being engaged and developed and offers a selection of original, insightful and imaginative papers by emerging and internationally renowned scholars, taken from the Seventh International Conference on the History of Records and Archives (I-CHORA 7).

The book, edited by Fiorella Foscarini, Heather MacNeil, Bonnie Mak and Gillian Oliver, reveals the richness of archival thinking through compelling examples from a wide variety of views of records, archives and archival functions, spanning diverse regions, communities, disciplinary perspectives and time that will captivate the reader.   Examples include the origins of contemporary grassroots archival activism in Poland, the role of women archivists in early 20th century England, the management of records in the Dutch East Indies in the 19th century, the relationship between Western and Indigenous cultures in North America and other modern archival conundrums.

The editors said, “Today, more than ever before, everyone, not only archives specialists, would benefit from a deeper and better informed engagement with archival objects and practices as they become increasingly engrained in our daily lives, from the pervasiveness of archival materials on the web, to the use of archive-based knowledge in all sciences, to the uncertainty about the preservation of our digital memories that we may all ex
perience sooner or later. The 11 essays selected for inclusion in this book explore different ways of historicizing and theorizing record making, recordkeeping and archiving pr
actices from a range of disciplinary perspectives and through the eyes of creators, custodians and users.”

 

Fiorella Foscarini PhD is an associate professor in the Faculty of
Information at the University of Toronto. She is Co-editor in Chief of the Records Management Journal and co-author of Records Management and Information Culture (Facet 2014)

Heather MacNeil PhD is a professor in the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto where she teaches courses in the areas of archival theory and practice and the history of record keeping.

Bonnie Mak PhD is an associate professor at the University of Illinois, jointly appointed in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science and the Program in Medieval Studies. She teaches courses in the history and future of the book, reading practices, and knowledge production.

Gillian Oliver PhD is an associate professor at Victoria Univeristy of Wellington. She is the co-author of Records Management and Information Culture (Facet 2014) and Digital Curation, 2nd edition (Facet 2016) and is Co-editor in Chief of the journal Archival Science.

 

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Preserving our Heritage wins SAA Preservation Publication Award

Preserving our Heritage: Perspectives from antiquity to the digital age by Michele V Cloonan is the recipient of the 2016 Society of American Archivists’ Preservation Publication Award.9781856049467

The book offers a unique compilation of key texts from a range of international contributors, charting the development of preservation from its origins to modern day practice and offers an overview of longevity, reversibility, enduring value and authenticity of information preservation.

The Awards Committee said “Preserving Our Heritage is undeniably a monumental achievement and a welcome contribution to the bookshelves of preservation professionals everywhere”.

Established in 1993, the SAA Preservation Publication Award recognises and acknowledges the author or editor of an outstanding published work related to archives preservation and, through this acknowledgement, encourages outstanding achievement by others.

Find out more about the book on the Facet Publishing website.

Addled by archives? Rattled by recordkeeping? Help for librarians is here at last

Chambers Cat 2.02.qxdThe No-nonsense Guide to Archives and Recordkeeping is ideal for professionals involved in the management of archives and records, especially if they are just starting out or without formal training.

The book covers all aspects of recordkeeping and archives management. It follows the records’ journey from creation, through the application of classification and access techniques, evaluation for business, legal and historical value and finally to destruction or preservation and access in the archive.

Based on the internationally renowned training days run by the author and her business partner, the book deals with records and archives in all formats. It utilizes checklists, practical exercises, sample documentation, case studies and helpful diagrams to ensure a very accessible and pragmatic approach, allowing anyone to get to grips with the basics quickly.

The book is divided into four main work areas:

  • current records: including creation, filing, classification and security
  • records management: including aims, risks, planning, preparation and delivery
  • archives management: including collecting policies, intellectual property rights, appraisal, digitization and outreach
  • archival preservation: including policy, disaster prevention and repositories.

Author Margaret Crockett said, “managing records and archives is really interesting and rewarding but it is also really important: if we can’t tame our paper and digital mountains into manageable documentation which tells the story of our lives, our organisations and our societies we cannot prove the things we need to prove and lose our memory of the past. My book aims to set out clearly all you need to know to understand the basic principles and concepts which underpin this often underestimated but crucial activity”.

More information: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=048552#.VlRCwXbhDcs

Sample chapter: http://www.booksonix.co.uk/facetpublishing/9781856048552.pdf

How information creation, capture, preservation and discovery are being transformed

Is Digital Different? focuses on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the Moss & E-P Is digital different COVER REVISEDinformation landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago. The very existence of the traditional library and archive is being challenged as more resources become available online and computers and supporting networks become increasingly powerful.

The book draws on examples of the impact of other new and emerging technologies on the information sciences in the past and emphasises that information systems have always been shaped by available technologies that have transformed the creation, capture, preservation and discovery of content.  It is edited by Michael Moss, Professor of Archiva
l Science at the University of Northumbria and Barbara Endicott-Popovsky, Executive Director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity at the University of Washington,

Key topics covered include:

  • Search in the digital environment
  • RDF and the semantic web
  • Crowd sourcing and engagement between institutions and individuals
  • Development of information management systems
  • Security: managing online risk
  • Long term curation and preservation
  • Rights and the Commons
  • Finding archived records in the digital age.

Is Digital Different? illustrates the ways in which the digital environment has the potential to transform scholarship and break down barriers between the academy and the wider community, and draws out both the inherent challenges and the opportunities for information professionals globally.

This book will be of particular to students, particularly those on information studies programs, and academics, researchers and archivists globally.

A sample chapter is available on the Facet website.

Is Digital Different?; September 2015; paperback; 224pp; 9781856048545; £49.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.

Up-to-date guidance on the complexities of copyright legislation for archivists and records managers

What is copyright? Who owns it and for how long? What rights does it confer, and what are the limitations and exceptions?

Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers uniquely outlines copyright law in the UK with special reference to materials relevant to archive and records collections such as maps, legal records, records of local authorities, records of churches and faiths, most notably unpublished works. It also offers advice on rights in the electronic environment and the problems associated with rights clearance; and covers related areas such as moral rights and rights in databases.Padfield_Copyright for archivists 5e_COVER

The fifth edition of this respected work has been extensively revised and updated to include:

  • a description of the major changes to copyright exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, including changes to library and archive copying for users and the declaration, changes to preservation copying and a new exception permitting on-site access to digital material
  • a major revision of the sections on copyright exceptions, including descriptions of the extension of preservation copying to museums, orphan works schemes, education, parody, text and data mining, quotation and private copying
  • information about dealing with copyright, including acknowledgements and liability,a new small claims procedure in the courts of England and Wales, and which courts have jurisdiction over an infringement on the internet
  • consideration of the many copyright cases that have come before the courts that have provided help with the interpretation of many aspects of the legislation; including the meaning of ‘transient and incidental’, ‘scientific research’, ‘parody’ and ‘originality’; whether hyperlinking infringes copyright; and the relationship between the rights of a copyright owner and freedom of speech.

Tim Padfield said, “I am sorry that archivists and records managers keep having to buy new editions of this book, but a book on the law is of no use if it is out of date. In this case the law has changed very significantly since the previous edition, particularly for those working with archives and records and in libraries, educational establishments and museums. I hope it will continue to be useful”.

More details about Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers and a free sample chapter can be found on the Facet website.

10 copyright conundrums clarified

Graham Cornish provides answers to ten tricky copyright questions in this blogpost. For further detail and answers to 851 other copyright questions see the newly-released fully up-to-date sixth edition of his classic book, Copyright: Interpreting the law for libraries, archivers and information services.

Q1. Is copyright a monopoly?US_Deluxe_Monopoly_Tokens

A. Not entirely. If two people create the same thing independently of each other  and without actually copying what the other person wrote or made (e.g. two people standing in exactly the same place taking a photograph), then both can claim copyright in what they created, even if they are identical.

Q2. Are things like trademarks and logos protected by copyright?

A. Yes. A logo is an artistic work and a trademark may well be an artistic work and/or a literary work as well. It is possible for a trademark to go out of copyright but still be a trademark as trademarks can last forever.

Flickr cc image from John Atherton

Flickr cc image from John Atherton

Q3. Who owns the copyright in a letter?

A. The author – the person who wrote the letter, not the archive that holds the letter or the recipient of the letter

Q4. Can any library make copies of literary, dramatic and musical works for preservation purposes?

A. No. They must be qualifying libraries (those that are publicly accessible, are the libraries of an educational establishment and is not owned by or part of a body which is conducted for profit).

Q5. Do people who appear in photographs have any rights over them?

A. Not under copyright law, but this is an area where particular care needs to be exercised. Although the person taking the photograph (or their employer if appropriate) owns the copyright, the use of that photograph may be restricted by other legal considerations e.g using the image of a famous person to promote a product can lead to claims of loss of revenue because the celebrity would have made a charge for having their name used in this way, even if the copyright in the photograph is owned by the person using it.

This 3d Printer is currently printing a turtle. http://www.fablabscarolinas.org/

Flickr cc image from: Keith Kissel

Q6. Will 3D printing always infringe copyright?

A. No. Many items that will be copied using 3D will not be protected by copyright e.g. items of crockery such as mugs or DIY materials such as screws or tools. They are protected by either patent or design right, if protected at all, and making a single copy is not an infringement.

Q7. Who owns the copyright in an interview?

A. The speaker owns the copyright in what is said but there is no copyright in the material until it has been recorded. Once it has been recorded the speaker owns the copyright in what has been said, but the person making the recording owns the copyright in the sound recording as such. If the interview is transcribed then the person making the transcription may also be entitled to copyright in their transcription.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/marfis75/6119436022/in/photolist-ajKH8C-9b45XN-dT63q-856aLS-dnvABk-amMHBV-6x3pc2-bD6e8F-8yZZoH-RXL7R-jV6vrh-ns17uC-bmnwzW-6CYVuw-2Yh65v-6CYVs9-qiTJR3-4gVU5C-peQjZ1-oB5Mon-33Y4jV-6QyPwR-5Ev4EF-nXPzGH-a7fAHV-a7dP1z-eBTDu-swvr53-nZSiKJ-rB1qtv-9HmR8k-5UtKpc-oKtTYY-uZuS19-oBjLAo-nwhxjV-nwAq3s-nwi9Uy-daumgp-7Z4xw1-7FAnYa-odJxRx-qTyTFp-oVNtUb-r65HkN-e97ofu-cBkLd7-a8NLKc-MCzm-m4aEF

Flickr cc image from Martin Fisch

Q8. Who is the author of a broadcast?

A. Essentially it is the person who transmits the programme if that person has any responsibility for its contents

Q9. Can databases be copied for private use like other works?

A. No. The exception for copying for private use it to copyright, not database right, and databases may not be copied for personal use. There are rules that enable some copying to take place but not on the same scale as private copying.

Q10. There are lots of websites now where individuals can post their own writings, photos, videos or recordings of songs. Are these protected by copyright?

A. Yes. Anything that you create as an individual and put up on any of these sites, chatrooms or blogs is technically your property.