Tagged: collections management

New edition of the essential textbook for collection development and management in libraries

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the fourth edition of Peggy Johnson’s Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management.

Johnson_PR image

Peggy Johnson has revised and fully updated this textbook to provide a timely and valuable new resource for LIS students and professionals. Each chapter offers complete introductory coverage of one aspect of collection development and management, before including numerous suggestions for further reading and study. A range of practical case studies are included to illustrate and explore all of the issues discussed.

Johnson said,

The twenty-first century has brought into question the role and value of collection development as a professional specialty. The shift from collections-centered to services-centered libraries, patron-driven acquisitions, consortial buying, serial bundles, aggregator e-book packages, mass digitizing projects, ubiquitous access to digital content, and the growth of open access can raise uncertainties about what a collections librarian’s responsibilities might be. Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management is based on the premise that the collections librarian’s role in this complex and evolving environment is now more important than ever.

This book will be useful as a comprehensive introduction and learning tool for LIS students, a timely update for experienced librarians with new collection development and management responsibilities, and a handy reference resource for practitioners as they go about their day-to-day work.

Technical Services Quarterly declared that the previous edition of the book,

must now be considered the essential textbook for collection development and management…the first place to go for reliable and informative advice.

The CILIP Rare Books Newsletter described it as,

an excellent summary of vital areas of collections development and management, which can also act as a guide to those navigating this challenging area of the profession in such times of rapid change.

Peggy Johnson has published several books, including ALA Editions’ Developing and Managing Electronic Collections: The Essentials, edited the peer-reviewed journal Library Resources & Technical Services for more than nine years and continues to edit Technicalities: Information Forum for the Technical Services Professional. She teaches as an adjunct professor in the MLIS program at St. Catherine University and received the ALCTS Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

 

Click here to sign up to our mailing list and hear more about new and forthcoming books.

Advertisements

Peggy Johnson speaks about her writing process and what’s important for today’s LIS graduates

This post was originally posted on the ALA Editions blog.

The first edition of Peggy Johnson’s text Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management was published in 2004. Needless to say a whole lot has changed in the last 14 years, and Johnson has kept updating and revising her book to keep current with the field. On the occasion of the publication of the new fourth edition, we spoke with her about her writing process, what’s important for today’s LIS graduates, and what lies ahead.

So, you’ve just published the fourth edition of your book! Congratulations! What were some of the differences working on the project this time around? And what have you learned over the years that a picture of author Peggy Johnsonyou wish you’d known from the beginning?

The process of research and writing I follow is basically the same as when I worked on the first edition. However, locating resources continues to get easier with full text online indexes and Google Scholar available. I still spend a lot of time verifying details. I confess I continue to print articles and borrow print books through interlibrary loan. I’ve tried keeping only digital files, but it doesn’t work for me. I need tangible copies I can hold and organize. One thing I wish I’d known earlier is how willing librarians and others in the field are to help. With this edition, I reached out to nearly fifty people, all of whom graciously answered my questions and offered advice.

Describe your writing and revision process—is it all electronic, or do you print out some drafts and go to work with a red pencil?

I’ve always written on the computer, but I do print each chapter about halfway through the writing so I can spread it out on my desk and move parts around. As I write a chapter, I create an detailed outline aiming to have a logical progression. Many of the writing techniques I learned in elementary school remain useful, although I don’t take notes on 3X5 cards. Once a chapter is nearly complete, I do the polishing on the electronic file.

Let’s say an LIS student approaches you for career advice. After getting that degree, what are some important first steps to take?

I always tell students to get library experience either through in internship or a practicum while in school. Employers look for some familiarity with the real world even when hiring recent LIS graduates. Involvement with professional organizations is important both because of the learning opportunities and because of the contacts made. New librarians seldom realize what a small world the library field is—building a network of support and potential references is critical.

Are vendor relations such as purchasing and licensing materials getting easier or more difficult? Why?

I think vendor relations are more complex. I added a chapter in this edition on vendor relations, negotiation, and contracts in part because library school faculty members and collection development librarians requested it. Once you understand that vendors are trained in selling and promoting their products and especially in negotiating effectively, you realize that librarians need parallel skills. Being aware of all the variables (and there are many) that go into making the best selection choice for your library is more important than ever. Even librarians who don’t make the final choices need to understand the issues and why decisions are made.

9781783302741.jpg

What’s the most surprising trend in the field of collection development and management? How do you see this discipline evolving over the next 5-10 years?

I first became interested in 1980s in what we were then calling machine readable data files (MRDFs).  It seemed obvious that they were going to have a significant and ever-increasing effect on library collections and services, so I can’t say I’ve been surprised by the role digital content plays in today’s libraries. Perhaps the wide-spread participation in consortial buying by all types of libraries might be considered surprising, but I’d say it’s a logical progression that began with consortial resource sharing. May be one development that is, indeed, surprising is the extent to which publishers are selling directly to libraries. Not too long ago, libraries relied on intermediaries (jobbers, vendors, and agents) because publishers didn’t want to deal with selling, invoicing, and shipping individual titles. Packages of titles (both e-journals and e-books) have changed the business model and made publishers major players. As far as that goes, I’m guessing that few librarians could foresee the extent to which libraries now purchase lrge packages of titles. I’m always leery of projecting the future—it is too easy to be wrong. That said, I think that the importance of managing legacy print collections will continue to grow and, I hope, we will see the development and implementation of national preservation and retention plans.

Learn more about the book on the Facet Publishing website.

10 tips for organising an exhibition for museums, libraries and archives

exhibition

Flickr cc image from linspiration01: https://www.flickr.com/photos/91429305@N07/8869154953

This blog post originally appeared on the CILIP website.

All of us who put on exhibitions know there is never enough time. Even when dates look good, there are always changes and unforeseen problems. In the run up to the opening, it really does seem to prove Parkinson’s Law – no matter how much time you have, it always seems to go up to the wire.

And then there are the things we forget – did we check the copyright on that item; what were the special conditions of that loan; does a particular lender require immunity from seizure; what light levels do we need?

Here are my top 10 tips for organising a successful exhibition:

1. Good planning and organisation

organizing

Flickr cc image from Lenore Edman: http://www.flickr.com/photos/80522246@N00/4600805014

This is the most important! Make sure you have enough time and people with the right knowledge and experience to carry out the project.

Organizing exhibitions is a process; objects don’t appear on display by magic and every exhibition is the result of planning and organisation. Consider your success factors from the outset and make sure the team keeps referring to them.

Make sure you have enough time for last minute changes or unforeseen problems. Couriers have been known to take their object home if they find the gallery is still being built or the display case is not ready.

Make a list of everything you have to do. It could include design, contracts, loans, transport, customs, licensing, insurance or indemnity, couriers, copyright, display cases, web page, education programmes and marketing.

2. Adequate budget

Money is not the most important thing but you must match your exhibition to your budget. Know exactly what the budget is and stick to it. You can always expand if more money comes in.

3. Documentation

documenting

Flickr cc image from Lauren Manning: http://www.flickr.com/photos/28541331@N00/6632168023

Set up good systems for logging objects, loans, dates, etc., and keep track of everything. Sign and date agreements. Keep records.

4. Team work

Every exhibition calls for teamwork. Have one team leader and regular team meetings.

5. Good communication & negotiation

communication

Flickr cc image from Stig Nygaard: http://www.flickr.com/photos/10259776@N00/450640129

Make sure everyone in the team knows what is happening and when. Talk to each other and have frequent communication with lenders and contractors. Most difficulties can be solved by negotiation.

6. Keep to the schedule

All exhibitions are time-bound, under pressure and with fixed deadlines. Have someone in charge of the schedule who makes sure everything is on time and who can take action if things start to slide.

Make sure the schedule is written down and available for everyone. It should set out all the key stages and milestones of the project with dates and the named responsible person. Activities can be plotted on the chart to make sure programme is on time.

7. Clear areas of responsibility

too many cooks

Flickr cc image from Rega Photography: http://www.flickr.com/photos/70794774@N04/7731824158

Make sure everyone’s role is clear so that there are not “too many cooks…” Who is responsible for making decisions and who has the last word?

8. Emergency response

Know what to do if things go wrong. Have the team do a risk assessment at the outset and draw up a response plan. Make sure everyone knows the plan.

9. Good maintenance

maintenance

Flickr cc image from Angelo DeSantis: http://www.flickr.com/photos/78023771@N00/8557695912

Make sure the exhibition looks as good on the last day as at the opening. Peeling labels, dirty marks or broken interactives give a poor message and also reduce visitor enjoyment.

10. Legacy

And when the exhibition closes, make sure all the hard work leaves something behind. A website, catalogue, workshop, app or partnerships can all continue to provide benefits long after the items have gone home.

The success of an exhibition doesn’t depend on size, money or visitor figures. Any exhibition can be a success with careful planning and good organisation.

About the author

Freda Matassa is author of Organizing Exhibitions: A handbook for museums, libraries and archives. Whether you organize exhibitions every day or are thinking of doing your first one, help is at hand in Organizing Exhibitions. The book is a simple step-by-step process with all the stages of putting on an exhibition from initial idea to closure and legacy. It’s designed for any size or type of display and makes sure that no key element is left out.