Tagged: Cultural Heritage

Art and design librarians of the world, read on, you have nothing to lose but your innocence

The second edition of The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship edited by Paul Glassman and Judy Dyki is out now.

Copy of Hamilton & Saunderson

Since the publication of the first edition of this handbook, the world of art and design libraries has been rocked by rapid advances in technology, an explosion in social media, the release of new standards and guidelines, shifts in the materials and processes of contemporary art, innovative developments in publishing models, expanding roles of librarians, new perspectives surrounding library spaces, and the evolving needs and expectations of art and design students.

Revised and updated with mostly new chapters, The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship provides an accessible guide to librarians working in art and design environments who need to support and anticipate the information needs of artists, designers, architects and historians who study those disciplines.

The authors said,

“The handbook delineates roles and responsibilities for art and design librarians, offers guidelines for materials and collections management, reviews best practice in teaching and learning, and presents innovative approaches to knowledge creation, library spaces and promotion and sustainability.”

Clive Phillpot, former Director of the Library at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, said,

“The contributors to this book are writing from the front line. So, art and design librarians of the world, read on, you have nothing to lose but your innocence.”

The book is out now and will be essential reading for students taking library and information science courses in art librarianship, special collections, and archives, as well as practising library and information professionals in art and design school libraries, art museum libraries and public libraries.

Paul Glassman is Director of University Libraries and Adjunct Instructor of Architectural History and Design at Yeshiva University.

 Judy Dyki is Director of Library and Academic Resources at Cranbrook Academy of Art and Editor of Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America.

Foreword by Clive Phillpot, Fermley Press, London (formerly Director of the Library, Museum of Modern Art, New York).

The book is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD. It is available in North America from the American Library Association.

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Practical guidance for valuing objects in cultural collections

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Freda Matassa’s new book Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives

Assigning a financial value to a cultural object is always difficult, as there is no right answer. It is one of the many tasks of the curator, whether they work in a gallery, museum, archive or library, yet it is a role for which few have had any traChambers Cat 2.02.qxdining and that many approach with a lack of confidence. Even if there is a profound knowledge of the subject matter, there may be insufficient experience in the market for cultural objects. However, although it may not be easy, it has to be done.

In Valuing Your Collection, collections management expert Freda Matassa examines the issues around valuing objects in cultural collections, describing current practice in museums, libraries and archives, and giving practical advice on how to assign values. Matassa looks at the difference between value and worth and at how cultural value can be translated into monetary terms. She outlines the arguments over whether financial values should be assigned at all and provides guidance on how to approach a valuation by making comparisons and using a step-by-step process for which templates for a wide range of collections are provided.

Matassa said,

Valuation is fraught with difficulties for cultural collections. Finance is not their core business. Curators have little or no training and are reluctant to mention money as it may detract from significance. My book is designed to give the non-specialist confidence in their decision making.

Freda Matassa FRSA MA (Hons) DipAL DipEd is a well-known UK expert on collections management who advises, teaches and lectures internationally. Currently Director of Matassa Toffolo, a museum-standard art consultancy, former Head of Collections Management at Tate Galleries and co-founder of the European Registrars Conference, she is expert adviser on several European projects for museum standards and to the Minister of Culture on Immunity from Seizure. She was named one of the Top 50 Women to Watch in the arts and is the author of Museum Collections Management (Facet, 2011) and Organizing Exhibitions (Facet, 2014).

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Management of cultural heritage information: policies and practices

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Image source: ‘Printing the pase: 3-D archaeology and the first Americans’ by Flickr user Bureau of Land Managment Oregon and Washington https://www.flickr.com/photos/blmoregon/

As the iConference 2017 continues this week, we’ve made a new chapter, written by one of the conference chairs Gobinda Chowdhury, freely available to view and download from the Facet Publishing website.

The chapter, Management of cultural heritage information: policies and practices, is taken from the 2015 book Cultural Heritage Information, edited by Gobinda and Ian Ruthven. The chapter includes discussion of:

  • some of the policies and guidelines for digitization that form the foundation of digital libraries of cultural heritage information
  • the social, legal and policy issues involved with managing digital cultural heritage and their implications
  • the provenance and digital rights management issues associated with cultural heritage information.

You can view or download the free chapter here.

Cultural Heritage Information is the first book in the iResearch series. Edited by Gobinda Chowdhury, iResearch is a peer-reviewed monograph series supports the vision of the iSchools and creates authorative sources of information for research and scholarly activities in information studies. Each book in the series addresses a specific aspect or 9781856049306emerging topic of information studies and provides a state-of-the-art review of research in the chosen field and addresses the issues, challenges and progress of research and practice.

Find out more about the book Cultural Heritage Information.

Find our more about the iResearch series.

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The case for open heritage data

open

An open access chapter from Henriette Roued-Cunliffe and Andrea Copeland’s new book Participatory Heritage is now available to view and download from the Facet Publishing website.

In this chapter, Henriette Roued-Cunliffe argues the case for open heritage data as a means to facilitating participation in heritage now and in the future. Three case studies feature in the chapter:

  1. Europeana APIs
  2. Vindolanda Tablets Online II
  3. Hack4DK in Denmark.

Participatory Heritage demonstrates how heritage institutions can work with community-based heritage groups to build broader, more inclusive and culturally relevant collections.

More information about the book and the open access chapter are available on the Facet website.

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How can heritage institutions work with their communities to build broader, more inclusive and culturally relevant collections?

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Participatory Heritage, edite9781783301232.jpgd by Henriette Roued-Cunliffe and Andrea Copeland

 The internet as a platform for facilitating human organization without the need for organizations has, through social media, created new challenges for cultural heritage institutions. Challenges include but are not limited to: how to manage copyright, ownership, orphan works, open data access to heritage representations and artefacts, crowdsourcing, cultural heritage amateurs, information as a commodity or information as public domain, sustainable preservation, attitudes towards openness and much more.

 Participatory Heritage uses a selection of international case studies to explore these issues. It demonstrates that in order for personal and community-based documentation and artefacts to be preserved and included in social and collective histories, individuals and community groups need the technical and knowledge infrastructures of support that formal cultural institutions can provide. In other words, both groups need each other.

The editors said, “It is our hope that this book will help information and heritage professionals learn from others who are engaging with participatory heritage communities”.

Henriette Roued-Cunliffe, DPhil is an Assistant Professor at the Royal School of Library and Information Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. She teaches and researches heritage data and information, and in particular how DIY culture is engaging with cultural heritage online and often outside of institutions. Her website is: roued.com.

Andrea Copeland is an Associate Professor in the Department of Library and Information Science in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University, Indianapolis. Her research focus is public libraries and their relationship with communities, with a current emphasis on connecting the cultural outputs of individuals and community groups to a sustainable preservation infrastructure.

Should we equate preservation of cultural heritage with human rights?

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Michele Cloonan, Dean Emirata and Professor at the Graduate School of Library & Information Science, Simmons College and editor of Preserving our Heritage :  Perspective from antiquity to the digital age, writes about the destruction of cultural heritage in a new blog for CILIP. An extract is below:

While most of us don’t equate preservation with human rights, the relationship has been touched on at least as early as the nineteenth century —although the destruction of cultural heritage has taken place for as long as there has been heritage. In the nineteenth century the concept of human rights was considered in the context of war. Swiss businessman and reformer Henri Dunant was an organiser of the First Geneva Conference for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded Armies in the Field (1863-64) and a founder of the Red Cross (see his Memory of Solferino [Geneva, Switzerland: International Committee of the Red Cross, 1986]).

At just about the same time as these activities were taking place in Europe, Francis Lieber, a German jurist who settled in the United States, prepared for the Union Army General Orders No. 100: Instructions for the Government of the Armies of the United States in the Field, better known as the Lieber Code; it established rules for the humane treatment of civilians in areas of conflict and forbade the execution of prisoners of war. Further it sought the protection of works of art, scientific collections, and hospitals in war-torn areas. These ideas were further developed in the Hague Peace Conferences that were held from 1899-1907 and in the later Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict (1954 and the 1999 Second Protocol). Excerpts of these codes, conventions, and protocols are included in chapter 9 of my books Preserving Our Heritage: Perspectives from antiquity to the digital age (London: Facet, 2015).

Read the full blog on the CILIP website.

A comprehensive account of research in digital cultural heritage

Cultural Heritage Information: Access and management, edited by G G Chowdhury and Ian Ruthven, th9781856049306e first book in the iResearch series, provides an overview of various challenges and contemporary research activities in cultural heritage information focusing particularly on the cultural heritage content types, their characteristic and digitization challenges; cultural heritage content organization and access issues; users and usability as well as various policy and sustainability issues associated with digital cultural heritage information systems and services.

The book contains eleven chapters that have been contributed by seventeen leading academics from six countries including; Melissa Terras, UCL; Paul Clough, University of Sheffield; Chris Alen Sula, Pratt Institute; Juliane Stiller, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin; Hussein Suleman, University of Cape Town and Ali Shiri, University of Alberta, Edmonton.

iResearch is a new academic series edited by G G Chowdhury, Professor in Information Science and Head of the Department of Mathematics and Information Science at Northumbria University. This peer-reviewed monograph series supports the vision of the iSchools and creates authoritative sources of information for research and scholarly activities in information studies. Each book in the series addresses a specific aspect or emerging topic of information studies and provides a state-of-the-art review of research in the chosen field and addresses the issues, challenges and progress of research and practice.

The series is overseen by an editorial board comprising; Peter Willett, University of Sheffield; Ian Ruthven, University of Strathclyde; Dorothy Williams, Robert Gordon University, Harry Bruce, University of Washington; Jonathan Furner, UCLA; Edie Rasmussen, University of British Columbia; Michael Seadle, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Fabio Crestani, University of Lugano; Schubert Foo, Nanyang Technological University and Shigeo Sugimoto, University of Tsukuba.

G G Chowdhury said, “I am excited with the launch of the iResearch series. I am very pleased to have an editorial advisory board that comprises experts from around the world in Information Science. I hope that Cultural Heritage Information and the future titles in the series will be able to address the growing market demand for monographs addressing different topical and emerging areas of research in Information.”

More info about the book: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=049306&category_code=603#.VO7_RPmsUew
More info about the series: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/category.php?category_code=603&series=y