Tagged: infolit

Exploring a workplace information literacy design

SONY DSCAn open access chapter from Information Literacy in the Workplace is available to view and download from the Facet Publishing website.

The chapter, Learning within for beyond: exploring a workplace information literacy design, written by Annemaree Lloyd, discusses:

  • how the intensification of work and creation of new ways of working can present librarians with challenges in terms of creating information literacy education that provides scaffolding for students’ transitions into professional or vocational practice.
  • how by addressing this need, librarians must balance students’ transitions at both ends of the process – into higher education or vocational settings, and then into the workplace. This complexity requires a recasting of pedagogical practices to accommodate changes in the nature of work. With this in mind, common themes drawn from practice-based research are used to construct a conceptualization of workplace information literacy instruction.

Information Literacy in the Workplace, edited by Marc Forster, explains how information literacy is essential to the contemporary workplace and is fundamental to competent, ethical and evidence-based practice.

More information about the book and the open access chapter are available on the Facet website.

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Interpret, understand and teach the ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Facet Publishing have announced the publication of Teaching Information Literacy Reframed: 50+ framework-based exercises for creating information-literate learners by Joanna M BurkBurkhardt_FACET COVER_01.jpghardt.

This book offers a starting point to understanding and applying teaching practices to the six threshold concepts listed in the Association for College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, an altogether new way of looking at information literacy.

Bestselling author and expert instructional librarian Burkhardt decodes the Framework, putting its conceptual approach into straightforward language and offering more than 50 classroom-ready Framework-based exercises.

Each chapter focuses on one of the six concepts and offers sample exercises that can be applied in single lecture periods or over semester-long courses. The book offers best practices in creating learning outcomes, assessments, and teaching tricks and tips. Finally, it offers perspectives on how learning, memory, and transfer of learning applies to the teaching of information literacy.

This book will assist librarians in teaching information literacy and enable their students to cross the threshold and become information literacy experts.

Copyright and E-learning: a guide for practitioners

Guest post by Jane Secker

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The second edition of the 2010 book Copyright and E-learning: A guide for practitioners is now available. The book covers the topic that has fascinated me for over a decade and been central to the job I do at LSE: copyright law and its relationship to e-learning or online learning.

This edition of the book benefits from being co-authored by Chris Morrison, who is Copyright Compliance and Licensing Officer at the University of Kent. Chris has not only helped me to improve and update the book, but made the research and writing process more enjoyable. When I first approached Chris to help update the book, I thought that his unbounded pedantry forensic attention to detail and wealth of knowledge about broader copyright issues might make him a useful proof-reader. I had done a first run through of the book to identify some key areas I wanted to update in light of the Hargreaves Review in 2014 and the new copyright exceptions in UK law. However, overall I felt much of the first edition might remain the same, perhaps with a few changes to take into account new terminology. It quickly became apparent once we started reviewing the content and discussing the book, that we had the opportunity to significantly update it, and make it a far better book. It was also clear I had more than a proof-reader but a co-author. As with any book about technology, 5 years is a long time, and technological developments made much of the contents of some chapters in need of real updating. For example, the term web 2.0 used throughout the first edition, really started to sound very dated.

Much of the intentions behind the first edition remain however. The book is designed to be read by practitioners and so it tries to offer pragmatic advice on a range of topics issues from digitising orphan works, to lecture recordings, the use of social media and MOOCs. We tried to write the book in a jargon-free easily digestible way, to hopefully make it a practical guide for learning technologists, but also teachers, lecturers and other learning support staff in higher education, schools, further education and even in a workplace learning setting, where online learning is used extensively.

Find out more about the book here or read Jane and Chris’ post on the CILIP blog where they provide six practical tips that are important to helping you approach any copyright issue.

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Image Credit: Flickr user eddiedangerousCopyright Sign, Image used under license (CC BY 2.0)

Critical Literacy for Information Professionals

This new book explores critical literacy theory and provides practical guidance to how it can be taught and applied in libraries.McNicol_Critical literacy_COVER_final_emailV2

The approach taken in critical literacy is not to read texts in isolation, but to develop an understanding of the cultural, ideological and sociolinguistic contexts in which they are created and read.

The book introduces critical literacy concepts in ways that are accessible to readers who are new to the subject while also appealing to those with greater knowledge by exploring critical literacy from a range of theoretical perspectives and linking these ideas to current debates in information studies.

Critical Literacy for Information Professionals also contains a series of practically-focussed case studies that describe tools or approaches that librarians have used to engage users in critical literacy. Drawing on examples from across library sectors including schools, public libraries, universities, workplaces and healthcare, these illustrate how critical literacy can be applied across a variety of library settings, including online and new media environments.

The book will be essential reading for librarians, information professionals and managers in all sectors, students of library and information science, school and higher education teachers and researchers.

6 free information literacy chapters

The excellent Librarian’s Information Literacy Conference (LILAC) kicks off today in Dublin. We thought that we would share with you some of our content that fits in with the themes of the conference, whether you are attending or not.

Here, you will find 6 free chapters from Facet books on information literacy, research support and the information behaviour, some of which are written by speakers at the conference.

Metaliteracy in Practice

Metaliteracy in Practice

Metaliteracy in Practice will provide inspiration for librarians and educators in need of up-to-date and thought-provoking information literacy curricula and instructional approaches.

Editors Trudi E. Jacobson and Thomas P. Mackey, respected leaders in distance education and library instruction, reframed information literacy in their acclaimed previous book, Metaliteracy: Reinventing information literacy to empower learners, which provided an inclusive framework that encompasses all the newer literacies such as digital, visual, cyber and media literacy. Metaliteracy in Practice builds on the success of this book, placing its concepts firmly in real-world practice and delivering a compilation of innovative and practical teaching ideas from some of the leading thinkers in library and information literacy instruction today.

Each chapter takes readers through the process of using the metaliteracy framework in new and exciting ways that easily transfer to the classroom and to work with students. These ideas are grounded in teaching traditional information literacy competencies but brought up-to-date with the addition of methods for teaching and learning about metacognition, information creation and participation in learning communities.

The case studies contained in this collection detail the hows and whys of curricular design for metaliteracy, suitable for both beginners and seasoned professionals. Readers will also benefit from the book’s practical ideas for:

  • teaching students about the importance of format choice
  • assessing user feedback
  • creating information as teachers
  • evaluating dynamic content critically and effectively
  • sharing information in collaborative environments.

The collection has some of the most innovative teaching ideas for inspiring librarians and educators to revise lessons on critical thinking and information literacy, so that their students will graduate with the ability to formulate and ask their own questions.

Find out more about Metaliteracy in Practice on the Facet website.