Tagged: Informatics

Practical guide on new methods and technologies involved in systematic searching

9781783303731.jpgFacet Publishing announces the publication of Systematic Searching: Practical ideas for improving results edited by Paul Levay and Jenny Craven.

In resource-poor, cost-saving times practical advice on new methods and technologies for information professionals on how to search more efficiently is needed.

Systematic Searching: Practical ideas for improving results brings together expert international practitioners and researchers to highlight the latest thinking on systematic searching. Beginning by looking at the role of the information specialist as an expert searcher, the book then examines the current challenges and the potential solutions to more effective searching in detail. The book​ blends theory and practice and takes into account several different approaches to information retrieval and information-seeking behaviour with special focus being given to searching for complex topics in a health-related environment. It does not presume an in-depth prior knowledge or experience of systematic searching and includes case studies, practical examples and ideas for further research and reading.

Divided into three parts, the book covers: theoretical approaches to evidence synthesis and the implications that these have for the search process; new technologies for retrieving evidence and how these are leading to new directions in information retrieval and evidence synthesis; the future of information specialists as expert searchers and how information professionals can develop their skills in searching, communication and collaboration to find new roles.

Carol Lefebvre, Independent Information Consultant and Co-Convenor of the Cochrane Information Retrieval Methods Group, said ‘Paul Levay and Jenny Craven have amassed, as editors of this book, an impressive, international array of information specialists and librarians together with other information retrieval experts and methodologists from academia, evidence synthesis organizations, libraries and elsewhere with considerable but diverse experience and expertise in systematic searching.’

Paul Levay is an Information Specialist at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). His research interests are in developing search methods to support Health Technology Assessments and public health guidelines. He has previously held posts at the National Police Library and the Greater London Authority. Paul is a chartered member of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Jenny Craven is an Information Specialist at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Previously, Jenny worked at the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM) at Manchester Metropolitan University; she worked on practical information related projects, with a particular focus on improving access to information for people with visual impairments. During this time she was on the standing committee of the IFLA libraries serving persons with disabilities group, and ran a series of workshops in developing countries for the FORCE Foundation charity on providing accessible library services. Her role at NICE involves supporting the information needs for a variety of programmes across NICE. She also works on internal projects to improve service delivery, the evaluation of information skills training, and to explore methods for the effective retrieval of information. She is the editor of two previous Facet Publishing books, Web Accessibility: Practical advice for the library and information professional (2008) and Access, Delivery, Performance: The future of libraries without walls (2009).

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New book imagines the archive of the future

Chambers Cat 2.02.qxdFacet Publishing announce the publication of Archival Futures edited by Caroline Brown.

It is widely acknowledged that the archival discipline is facing a time of change. The digital world has presented changes in how records are created, used, stored and communicated. At the same time, there is increased public debate over issues such as ownership of and access to information and its authenticity and reliability in a networked and interconnected world.

Archival Futures draws on the contributions of a range of international experts to consider the current archival landscape and imagine the archive of the future. Firmly rooted in current professional debate and scholarship, the book offers thought provoking and accessible chapters that aim to challenge and inspire archivists globally and to encourage debate about their futures. Chapters cover the role of archives in relation to individuals, organisations, communities and society; how appraisal, arrangement, description and access might be affected in the future; changing societal expectations in terms of access to information, how information is exchanged, and how things are recorded and remembered; the impact of new technologies, including blockchain and automation; the place of traditional archives and what ‘the archive’ is or might become; the future role of the archive profession; and archives as authentic and reliable evidence

Tom Nesmith (University of Manitoba), said

‘Archives play a unique and powerful role in making the past available for an extraordinary array of current purposes. But do archives have a future, particularly given disruptive changes in communication technologies? Archival Futures addresses this and other challenges to find ways forward for the now pivotal role of archives in society.’

The book will appeal to an international audience of students, academics and practitioners in archival science, records management, and library and information science.

Caroline Brown is Programme Leader for the archives programmes at the Centre for Archive and Information Studies at the University of Dundee where she is also University Archivist.. She is a Chair of Archives and Records Association (UK & Ireland’s) Conference Committee, sits on its Professional Development Committee, having formerly served as the Chair of the Education, Training and Development Committee, and is a member of the Executive Committee for ARA Scotland. She is a sits on the Section Bureau of the International Council on Archives Section on Archival Education and is active in ICA/SUV . She is an Arts and Humanities Research Council Peer Review College and Panel Member and has written and spoken on a range of archival and recordkeeping issues. She is the editor of Archives and Recordkeeping: Theory into practice (Facet, 2013).

Contributors
Jenny Bunn, University College London; Luciana Duranti, University of British Columbia; Joanne Evans, Monash University; Craig Gauld, University of Dundee; Victoria Lemieux, University of British Columbia; Michael Moss, Northumbria University; Gillian Oliver, Monash University; Sonia Ranade, The National Archives; Barbara Reed, consultant; Kate Theimer, writer, speaker and commentator; David Thomas, Northumbria University; Frank Upward, Monash University; Geoffrey Yeo University College London.

 

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Annual Review of Cultural Heritage Informatics

This presentation takes you chapter-by-chapter through the new edited collection from Facet, Annual Review of Cultural Heritage Informatics.