Tagged: information science

Supporting students with blended learning

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“support” by Igor Grushevskiy, used under CC BY 2.0

Barbara Allan, author of the forthcoming Facet book Emerging Strategies for Supporting Student Learning, writes about supporting student learning with blended learning on the Information Today Europe website. Read the arcticle here.

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Foundations of Library and Information Science

Foundations of LIS

Foundations of Library and Information Science offers a firm underpinning of knowledge and guidance for LIS students and professionals alike. It will prepare LIS students and professionals to cope with and effectively manage their many complex responsibilities by:

  • providing an introduction to the LIS field
  • identifying and discussing the current major topics and issues in LIS that will continue to affect the profession for years to come
  • providing librarians and information professionals with an opportunity to refresh their knowledge through a systematic review of the major issues and topics that have changed the field
  • placing LIS in a larger social, political, economic, political and cultural context
  • inviting readers to further explore topics raised in the book.

Responding to the many changes occurring both in the field and in society at large, this text includes comprehensive coverage of:

  • the impact of digital devices and social networking
  • the impact of digital publishing and e-books
  • the evolution of library services including virtual reference, embedded librarianship, digital access and repositories, digital preservation and civic engagement
  • the new efforts to organize knowledge including FRBR, RDF, BIBFRAME, the semantic web and the next-generation library catalogue
  • the significance of the digital divide and policy issues related to broadband access and network neutrality
  • legal developments including new interpretations of copyright related to mass digitization of books and scholarly articles
  • the continuing tensions in LIS education between information science and library science
  • new initiatives to integrate libraries, archives, and museums.

Spanning all types of libraries, from public to academic, school, and special, this book illuminates the major facets of library and information science for aspiring professionals as well as those already practicing in the field.

Foundations of Library and Information Science; December 2015; paperback; 648pp; 9781783300846; £54.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD.  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.

Is the traditional library business model dead?

Library Management in Disruptive Times: Skills and knowledge for an uncertain future examines the effects of disruptive change on libraries, library management and library managers and identifies the key skills and attitudes needed by the library leaders of today and tomorrow.O'Connor_Disruptive_COVER

With contributions from expert professional library leaders and educators, this edited collection offers thought-provoking perspectives on the challenge of the current operating environment across a range of library sectors, library professional associations and geographic regions. As leading influencers of the professional thinking and management behaviours of the profession, the contributors apply their own unique perspectives to the challenges of disruptive change in libraries globally.

Key topics covered include:

  • leading change
  • management fads and their impact on libraries
  • user engagement
  • the value of collaboration and consortia
  • library management and the global economic crisis
  • agile management techniques
  • the role of professional associations in redefining the profession
  • developing management skills on the job
  • planning for the future.

This dynamic collection helps readers to envision the purpose and value of future libraries and to see change as a rare opportunity to create truly new roles for librarians.

This book will be essential reading for library managers, directors and aspiring leaders throughout the world.

Find out more and look inside the book on the Facet website.

How information creation, capture, preservation and discovery are being transformed

Is Digital Different? focuses on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the Moss & E-P Is digital different COVER REVISEDinformation landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago. The very existence of the traditional library and archive is being challenged as more resources become available online and computers and supporting networks become increasingly powerful.

The book draws on examples of the impact of other new and emerging technologies on the information sciences in the past and emphasises that information systems have always been shaped by available technologies that have transformed the creation, capture, preservation and discovery of content.  It is edited by Michael Moss, Professor of Archiva
l Science at the University of Northumbria and Barbara Endicott-Popovsky, Executive Director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity at the University of Washington,

Key topics covered include:

  • Search in the digital environment
  • RDF and the semantic web
  • Crowd sourcing and engagement between institutions and individuals
  • Development of information management systems
  • Security: managing online risk
  • Long term curation and preservation
  • Rights and the Commons
  • Finding archived records in the digital age.

Is Digital Different? illustrates the ways in which the digital environment has the potential to transform scholarship and break down barriers between the academy and the wider community, and draws out both the inherent challenges and the opportunities for information professionals globally.

This book will be of particular to students, particularly those on information studies programs, and academics, researchers and archivists globally.

A sample chapter is available on the Facet website.

Is Digital Different?; September 2015; paperback; 224pp; 9781856048545; £49.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.

Practical Copyright for Library and Information Professionals

The UK’s copyright legislation has been referred to as the longest, most confusing and hardest to navigate in the world. Pedley Practical copyright COVER 01Practical Copyright for Library and Information Professionals brings clarity to what would otherwise be a complex topic. Author Paul Pedley provides sensible and realistic guidance for all library and information practitioners. Fully up-to-date with the changes to copyright law in 2014/5, the book covers the following key topics:

  • the copyright exceptions or permitted acts most relevant to library and information professionals
  • lending of print and electronic copyright materials
  • the range of licensing solutions available to ensure that the use of copyright works is done in compliance with the law
  • the options available for making copies of orphan works (such as where this is done as part of digitization projects)
  • an exploration of how information professionals working in the corporate sector can copy material legitimately, and highlights where this differs from practitioners working in not for profit publicly accessible libraries.

Practical Copyright for Library and Information Professionals is an indispensable guide for library and information professionals; it will be useful for academics and researchers, and it will also be essential reading for anyone wishing to use copyright material legitimately.

Introduction to Information Behaviour

Introduction to InfoLayout 1rmation Behaviour uses a combination of theory and practical context to map out what information behaviour is and what we currently know about it, before addressing how it can be better understood in the future. Author Nigel Ford, Professor of Information Science at The University of Sheffield, argues that new understandings of information behaviour research may help maximise the quality and effectiveness of the way information is presented, sought, discovered, evaluated and used.

The book introduces the key concepts, issues and themes of information behaviour, illustrates them using key research studies, and provides a clear path through the complex maze of theories and models. The book is structured to move from the basics to the more complex and employs the pedagogical device of “THINK” boxes which invite the reader to think about concepts as they are introduced in order to consolidate their understanding before moving on. Case studies are included throughout the text and each chapter concludes with a round-up of what has been covered, highlighting the implications for professional information practice.

The key topics covered include:

  • Defining information behaviour and why is it useful to know about it
  • Information needs
  • Information seeking and acquisition
  • Collaborative information behaviour
  • Factors affecting information behaviour
  • Models and theories of information behaviour
  • Research approaches and methodologies
  • Designing information systems
  • The future trajectory of information behaviour research and practice.

Part of the Foundation of the Information Sciences series, this book will be core reading for students around the world, particularly those on library and information science courses. It will also be of interest to practitioners and professional information users, providers and developers.

Introduction to Information Behaviour ; August 2015; paperback; 224pp; 9781856048507; £49.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.

10 copyright conundrums clarified

Graham Cornish provides answers to ten tricky copyright questions in this blogpost. For further detail and answers to 851 other copyright questions see the newly-released fully up-to-date sixth edition of his classic book, Copyright: Interpreting the law for libraries, archivers and information services.

Q1. Is copyright a monopoly?US_Deluxe_Monopoly_Tokens

A. Not entirely. If two people create the same thing independently of each other  and without actually copying what the other person wrote or made (e.g. two people standing in exactly the same place taking a photograph), then both can claim copyright in what they created, even if they are identical.

Q2. Are things like trademarks and logos protected by copyright?

A. Yes. A logo is an artistic work and a trademark may well be an artistic work and/or a literary work as well. It is possible for a trademark to go out of copyright but still be a trademark as trademarks can last forever.

Flickr cc image from John Atherton

Flickr cc image from John Atherton

Q3. Who owns the copyright in a letter?

A. The author – the person who wrote the letter, not the archive that holds the letter or the recipient of the letter

Q4. Can any library make copies of literary, dramatic and musical works for preservation purposes?

A. No. They must be qualifying libraries (those that are publicly accessible, are the libraries of an educational establishment and is not owned by or part of a body which is conducted for profit).

Q5. Do people who appear in photographs have any rights over them?

A. Not under copyright law, but this is an area where particular care needs to be exercised. Although the person taking the photograph (or their employer if appropriate) owns the copyright, the use of that photograph may be restricted by other legal considerations e.g using the image of a famous person to promote a product can lead to claims of loss of revenue because the celebrity would have made a charge for having their name used in this way, even if the copyright in the photograph is owned by the person using it.

This 3d Printer is currently printing a turtle. http://www.fablabscarolinas.org/

Flickr cc image from: Keith Kissel

Q6. Will 3D printing always infringe copyright?

A. No. Many items that will be copied using 3D will not be protected by copyright e.g. items of crockery such as mugs or DIY materials such as screws or tools. They are protected by either patent or design right, if protected at all, and making a single copy is not an infringement.

Q7. Who owns the copyright in an interview?

A. The speaker owns the copyright in what is said but there is no copyright in the material until it has been recorded. Once it has been recorded the speaker owns the copyright in what has been said, but the person making the recording owns the copyright in the sound recording as such. If the interview is transcribed then the person making the transcription may also be entitled to copyright in their transcription.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/marfis75/6119436022/in/photolist-ajKH8C-9b45XN-dT63q-856aLS-dnvABk-amMHBV-6x3pc2-bD6e8F-8yZZoH-RXL7R-jV6vrh-ns17uC-bmnwzW-6CYVuw-2Yh65v-6CYVs9-qiTJR3-4gVU5C-peQjZ1-oB5Mon-33Y4jV-6QyPwR-5Ev4EF-nXPzGH-a7fAHV-a7dP1z-eBTDu-swvr53-nZSiKJ-rB1qtv-9HmR8k-5UtKpc-oKtTYY-uZuS19-oBjLAo-nwhxjV-nwAq3s-nwi9Uy-daumgp-7Z4xw1-7FAnYa-odJxRx-qTyTFp-oVNtUb-r65HkN-e97ofu-cBkLd7-a8NLKc-MCzm-m4aEF

Flickr cc image from Martin Fisch

Q8. Who is the author of a broadcast?

A. Essentially it is the person who transmits the programme if that person has any responsibility for its contents

Q9. Can databases be copied for private use like other works?

A. No. The exception for copying for private use it to copyright, not database right, and databases may not be copied for personal use. There are rules that enable some copying to take place but not on the same scale as private copying.

Q10. There are lots of websites now where individuals can post their own writings, photos, videos or recordings of songs. Are these protected by copyright?

A. Yes. Anything that you create as an individual and put up on any of these sites, chatrooms or blogs is technically your property.