Tagged: information science

Critical Literacy for Information Professionals

This new book explores critical literacy theory and provides practical guidance to how it can be taught and applied in libraries.McNicol_Critical literacy_COVER_final_emailV2

The approach taken in critical literacy is not to read texts in isolation, but to develop an understanding of the cultural, ideological and sociolinguistic contexts in which they are created and read.

The book introduces critical literacy concepts in ways that are accessible to readers who are new to the subject while also appealing to those with greater knowledge by exploring critical literacy from a range of theoretical perspectives and linking these ideas to current debates in information studies.

Critical Literacy for Information Professionals also contains a series of practically-focussed case studies that describe tools or approaches that librarians have used to engage users in critical literacy. Drawing on examples from across library sectors including schools, public libraries, universities, workplaces and healthcare, these illustrate how critical literacy can be applied across a variety of library settings, including online and new media environments.

The book will be essential reading for librarians, information professionals and managers in all sectors, students of library and information science, school and higher education teachers and researchers.

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Why did you want to write a book on ‘Emerging strategies for supporting student learning’?

In this blog, Barbara Allan talks about why she wrote her new book, Emerging Strategies for Supporting Student Learning

Whitby

Why did you want to write a book on ‘Emerging strategies for supporting student learning’?  A colleague asked me this question a few weeks ago and it prompted me into reflecting on my motivation for writing my new book.

Thinking about it made me realise how much I enjoy the process of writing a book and, in part, this is because I am very nosy. Higher education is under huge pressures at the moment and as a result many universities and colleges are going through radical change processes. In some instances, the whole undergraduate curriculum has been redesigned and redeveloped to bring it into line with the needs of current students and their future employers. In many institutions, everyone is expected to do ‘more with less’ and teams and individuals have risen to this challenge by introducing fascinating innovations to their approaches to learning and teaching. Sometimes, these changes have been supported through technology while others have involved working in new ways with colleagues from across their university or college. At the same time, new theories about digital and information literacy continue to develop.

Writing a book gave me an excuse (not that I really needed one) to explore current practices in supporting student learning in universities and colleges. This meant that I found time to talk to colleagues, visit institutions, constantly search on-line for new developments and innovations, as well as articles, and also network through conferences and professional events. One of the highlights of my research was my visit to the annual international LILAC conference in Newcastle in 2015. This friendly and accessible conference provided so many opportunities to listen to and talk with practitioners representing many different types of institution from across the world. Their online archive provided a great resource when I came to writing the book. The conference also gave me the opportunity to join a tour of the historical Newcastle Literary and Philosophical Society (the Lit and Phil – http://www.litandphil.org.uk) which is home to many scholars and authors.

Finally, I enjoy the process of putting it all together – the practice and the theory – rather like a giant jigsaw. Only, in this case, some of the pieces over-lapped and others were contradictory. I was fortunate enough to do much of the writing in Whitby and so enjoyed long walks whenever I got stuck or needed to think through my findings. Puzzling through my research and making sense of it was intellectually challenging and helped me to understand the current status of supporting student learning in higher education. It also made me realise how vibrant is the library and information profession and the willingness of colleagues to change and innovate.

Find out more about Barbara’s new book here.

Library support for the research lifecycle

Starr Hoffman has made two videos to support her new book Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries, published this month by Facet. The first video describes how academic libraries can support the research lifecycle for faculty and students and the second introduces the book and defines ‘research support’.

Supporting students with blended learning

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“support” by Igor Grushevskiy, used under CC BY 2.0

Barbara Allan, author of the forthcoming Facet book Emerging Strategies for Supporting Student Learning, writes about supporting student learning with blended learning on the Information Today Europe website. Read the arcticle here.

Foundations of Library and Information Science

Foundations of LIS

Foundations of Library and Information Science offers a firm underpinning of knowledge and guidance for LIS students and professionals alike. It will prepare LIS students and professionals to cope with and effectively manage their many complex responsibilities by:

  • providing an introduction to the LIS field
  • identifying and discussing the current major topics and issues in LIS that will continue to affect the profession for years to come
  • providing librarians and information professionals with an opportunity to refresh their knowledge through a systematic review of the major issues and topics that have changed the field
  • placing LIS in a larger social, political, economic, political and cultural context
  • inviting readers to further explore topics raised in the book.

Responding to the many changes occurring both in the field and in society at large, this text includes comprehensive coverage of:

  • the impact of digital devices and social networking
  • the impact of digital publishing and e-books
  • the evolution of library services including virtual reference, embedded librarianship, digital access and repositories, digital preservation and civic engagement
  • the new efforts to organize knowledge including FRBR, RDF, BIBFRAME, the semantic web and the next-generation library catalogue
  • the significance of the digital divide and policy issues related to broadband access and network neutrality
  • legal developments including new interpretations of copyright related to mass digitization of books and scholarly articles
  • the continuing tensions in LIS education between information science and library science
  • new initiatives to integrate libraries, archives, and museums.

Spanning all types of libraries, from public to academic, school, and special, this book illuminates the major facets of library and information science for aspiring professionals as well as those already practicing in the field.

Foundations of Library and Information Science; December 2015; paperback; 648pp; 9781783300846; £54.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD.  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.

Is the traditional library business model dead?

Library Management in Disruptive Times: Skills and knowledge for an uncertain future examines the effects of disruptive change on libraries, library management and library managers and identifies the key skills and attitudes needed by the library leaders of today and tomorrow.O'Connor_Disruptive_COVER

With contributions from expert professional library leaders and educators, this edited collection offers thought-provoking perspectives on the challenge of the current operating environment across a range of library sectors, library professional associations and geographic regions. As leading influencers of the professional thinking and management behaviours of the profession, the contributors apply their own unique perspectives to the challenges of disruptive change in libraries globally.

Key topics covered include:

  • leading change
  • management fads and their impact on libraries
  • user engagement
  • the value of collaboration and consortia
  • library management and the global economic crisis
  • agile management techniques
  • the role of professional associations in redefining the profession
  • developing management skills on the job
  • planning for the future.

This dynamic collection helps readers to envision the purpose and value of future libraries and to see change as a rare opportunity to create truly new roles for librarians.

This book will be essential reading for library managers, directors and aspiring leaders throughout the world.

Find out more and look inside the book on the Facet website.

How information creation, capture, preservation and discovery are being transformed

Is Digital Different? focuses on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the Moss & E-P Is digital different COVER REVISEDinformation landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago. The very existence of the traditional library and archive is being challenged as more resources become available online and computers and supporting networks become increasingly powerful.

The book draws on examples of the impact of other new and emerging technologies on the information sciences in the past and emphasises that information systems have always been shaped by available technologies that have transformed the creation, capture, preservation and discovery of content.  It is edited by Michael Moss, Professor of Archiva
l Science at the University of Northumbria and Barbara Endicott-Popovsky, Executive Director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity at the University of Washington,

Key topics covered include:

  • Search in the digital environment
  • RDF and the semantic web
  • Crowd sourcing and engagement between institutions and individuals
  • Development of information management systems
  • Security: managing online risk
  • Long term curation and preservation
  • Rights and the Commons
  • Finding archived records in the digital age.

Is Digital Different? illustrates the ways in which the digital environment has the potential to transform scholarship and break down barriers between the academy and the wider community, and draws out both the inherent challenges and the opportunities for information professionals globally.

This book will be of particular to students, particularly those on information studies programs, and academics, researchers and archivists globally.

A sample chapter is available on the Facet website.

Is Digital Different?; September 2015; paperback; 224pp; 9781856048545; £49.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.