Tagged: Research Data

Practical guidance for any librarian learning to deal with data

Facet Publishing have announced the release of The Data Librarian’s Handbook by Robin Rice and John Southall.9781783300471-frontcover.jpg.jpg

This new book, written by two data librarians with over 30 years’ experience, unpicks the everyday role of the data librarian and offers practical guidance on how to collect, curate and crunch data for economic, social and scientific purposes.

Interest in data has been growing in recent years. Support for this peculiar class of digital information – its use, preservation and curation, and how to support researchers’ production and consumption of it in ever greater volumes to create new knowledge, is needed more than ever. Many librarians and information professionals are finding their working life is pulling them toward data support or research data management but lack the skills required.

Covering everything from handling, managing and curating data; data literacy; research data management policies; data management plans; data repositories; confidential or sensitive data; open scholarship and open science, The Data Librarian’s Handbook is a must-read for all new entrants to the field, LIS students and working professionals.

The authors said, “Our aim is to offer an insider’s view of data librarianship as it is today, with plenty of practical examples and advice. At times we link this to wider academic and research agendas and scholarly communication trends, while grounding these thoughts back in theeveryday work of data librarians and other information professionals”.

Robin Rice is Data Librarian at EDINA and Data Library, an organisation providing data
services for research and education based in Information Services at the University of Edinburgh.

John Southall is Data Librarian for the Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford. He is based in the Social Science Library and is subject consultant for Economics, Sociology and Social Policy & Intervention.

 

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Library support for the research lifecycle

Starr Hoffman has made two videos to support her new book Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries, published this month by Facet. The first video describes how academic libraries can support the research lifecycle for faculty and students and the second introduces the book and defines ‘research support’.

Creative ideas & practical guidance for librarians supporting research & scholarly communication

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Facet are pleased to announce the release of two new books, Practical Tips for Facilitating Research and Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries.

Higher education is in a period of rapid evolution and academic libraries must continually evaluate and adjust their services to meet new needs. Librarian roles are changing and new specialisms, such as data librarians are emerging.  Activities are being driven by researcher requirements such as the demand for wider dissemination and the impact of research.

Two new books from Facet Publishing, Practical Tips for Facilitating Research and Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries, will provide inspiration and practical guidance to enable LIS staff developing their role in the research environment to evaluate their current provision and develop services to meet the evolving needs of the research community.

Practical Tips for Facilitating Research offers innovative tips and reliable best practice to assist academic liaison librarians, research support librarians and all library and information professionals who work with research staff and students.

Author Moira Bent said, “my book bridges the gap between theory and practice, grounding the very practical ideas garnered from library and information staff around the world in current research in the library and information science discipline.”

Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries provides inspiration through illustrative examples of emerging models of research support and is contributed to by library practitioners from across the world.

Editor Starr Hoffman said, “Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries is designed to inspire librarians and administrators to think of ‘research support’ not merely as Reference 2.0, but as an innovative, holistic activity that should be distributed throughout the organization.”

A preview chapter for each book is available on the Facet website, along with information about how to order.

Preview Practical Tips for Facilitating Research

Preview Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries

The Future of Scholarly Communication

The slideshow below takes you chapter-by-chapter through the new Facet title edited by Deborah Shorley and Michael Jubb, The Future of Scholarly Communication.

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Changing ways of sharing research in chemistry

Chemistry is widely considered to stand at the crossroads of many disciplines, with signposts to molecular, life, materials, polymer, environmental and computer sciences, as well as to physics and mathematics, and even art and design. To collaborate and share research data and ideas across these areas, research scientists must strive (and do not always succeed) to find common languages to express their intended concepts.

(Rzepa, Henry S. (2013). Changing ways of sharing research in chemistry. In: Shorley, Deborah and Jubb, Michael. The Future of Scholarly Communication. London: Facet Publishing. 3).

Changing ways of sharing research in chemistry

Image source: Flickr cc pic by bryankennedy

The following is an abstract of the Henry S. Rzepa’s chapter ‘Changing ways of sharing research in chemistry’ in The Future of Scholarly Communication.  A PDF of the full chapter is available for free on the Facet Publishing website.

The challenges of sharing research in chemistry are introduced via the molecule and how its essential information features might be formalized. The review then covers a period of around 33 years, describing how scientists used to share information about the molecule, and how that sharing has evolved during a period that has seen the widespread introduction of several disruptive technologies. These include e-mail and its now ubiquitous attachment, the world wide web and its modern expression via blogs and wikis. The review describes how digital documents have similarly evolved during this period, acquiring in some cases digital rights management, metadata and most recently an existence in the cloud. The review also describes how the dissemination of digital research data has also changed dramatically, the most recent innovation being data repositories, and speculates what the future of sharing research via the latest disruptive technology, tablets, might be.

ImageRead the full chapter for free.

Browse the table of contents, full contributor list and abstracts of all the other chapters.