Tagged: Semantic web

Practical guide on new methods and technologies involved in systematic searching

9781783303731.jpgFacet Publishing announces the publication of Systematic Searching: Practical ideas for improving results edited by Paul Levay and Jenny Craven.

In resource-poor, cost-saving times practical advice on new methods and technologies for information professionals on how to search more efficiently is needed.

Systematic Searching: Practical ideas for improving results brings together expert international practitioners and researchers to highlight the latest thinking on systematic searching. Beginning by looking at the role of the information specialist as an expert searcher, the book then examines the current challenges and the potential solutions to more effective searching in detail. The book​ blends theory and practice and takes into account several different approaches to information retrieval and information-seeking behaviour with special focus being given to searching for complex topics in a health-related environment. It does not presume an in-depth prior knowledge or experience of systematic searching and includes case studies, practical examples and ideas for further research and reading.

Divided into three parts, the book covers: theoretical approaches to evidence synthesis and the implications that these have for the search process; new technologies for retrieving evidence and how these are leading to new directions in information retrieval and evidence synthesis; the future of information specialists as expert searchers and how information professionals can develop their skills in searching, communication and collaboration to find new roles.

Carol Lefebvre, Independent Information Consultant and Co-Convenor of the Cochrane Information Retrieval Methods Group, said ‘Paul Levay and Jenny Craven have amassed, as editors of this book, an impressive, international array of information specialists and librarians together with other information retrieval experts and methodologists from academia, evidence synthesis organizations, libraries and elsewhere with considerable but diverse experience and expertise in systematic searching.’

Paul Levay is an Information Specialist at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). His research interests are in developing search methods to support Health Technology Assessments and public health guidelines. He has previously held posts at the National Police Library and the Greater London Authority. Paul is a chartered member of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Jenny Craven is an Information Specialist at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Previously, Jenny worked at the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM) at Manchester Metropolitan University; she worked on practical information related projects, with a particular focus on improving access to information for people with visual impairments. During this time she was on the standing committee of the IFLA libraries serving persons with disabilities group, and ran a series of workshops in developing countries for the FORCE Foundation charity on providing accessible library services. Her role at NICE involves supporting the information needs for a variety of programmes across NICE. She also works on internal projects to improve service delivery, the evaluation of information skills training, and to explore methods for the effective retrieval of information. She is the editor of two previous Facet Publishing books, Web Accessibility: Practical advice for the library and information professional (2008) and Access, Delivery, Performance: The future of libraries without walls (2009).

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How information creation, capture, preservation and discovery are being transformed

Is Digital Different? focuses on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the Moss & E-P Is digital different COVER REVISEDinformation landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago. The very existence of the traditional library and archive is being challenged as more resources become available online and computers and supporting networks become increasingly powerful.

The book draws on examples of the impact of other new and emerging technologies on the information sciences in the past and emphasises that information systems have always been shaped by available technologies that have transformed the creation, capture, preservation and discovery of content.  It is edited by Michael Moss, Professor of Archiva
l Science at the University of Northumbria and Barbara Endicott-Popovsky, Executive Director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity at the University of Washington,

Key topics covered include:

  • Search in the digital environment
  • RDF and the semantic web
  • Crowd sourcing and engagement between institutions and individuals
  • Development of information management systems
  • Security: managing online risk
  • Long term curation and preservation
  • Rights and the Commons
  • Finding archived records in the digital age.

Is Digital Different? illustrates the ways in which the digital environment has the potential to transform scholarship and break down barriers between the academy and the wider community, and draws out both the inherent challenges and the opportunities for information professionals globally.

This book will be of particular to students, particularly those on information studies programs, and academics, researchers and archivists globally.

A sample chapter is available on the Facet website.

Is Digital Different?; September 2015; paperback; 224pp; 9781856048545; £49.95; is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD  The US edition is available in North America through ALA Editions.

Facilitating Access to the Web of Data

Chris Mavergames said the following about the new Facet book Facilitating Access to the Web of Data by David Stuart:

‘All in all, Stuart has produced a must-read for any library or information professional (or anyone working in the delivery, structuring and organization of information via the web, which includes a whole host of other folks). Without getting mired in technical details, but yet providing enough for the uninitiated to get a “flavour” for what’s involved, there is enough here to sink one’s teeth into and links to other resources for further reading to expand on the concepts introduced in this work. I highly recommend it!’

Mavergames is an Information Architect at the Cochrane Collaboration in Freiburg, Germany.  The full review can be read on his website which is also an excellent resource for librarians interested in web 2,0 and linked data.

More information about the book, including the table of contents and a free sample chapter can be found on the Facet website.