Tagged: special collections

How do I make a career in Special Collections?

Guest post by Alison Cullingford, author of The Special Collections Handbook.

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Why work in Special Collections?

Special Collections work is fantastically rewarding: one never knows what will happen when the phone rings or a new email comes in.  It is a joy to bring hidden collections to life, to see how they inform and inspire users.

Special Collections is a sector which is booming and full of confidence and innovation.  Many universities and other organisations are realising that in tough times their collections are unique and distinctive assets, and investing in premises, and, crucially, staff.

A note of caution

As with most heritage and arts careers, Special Collections work is popular and therefore competition for jobs can be significant.  The widest range of opportunities is probably in London or ‘Oxbridge’, though do not despair: there are jobs in national libraries, research libraries and universities, cathedrals etc all over the UK.  Permanent roles are scarce so project work is often the way to get into the sector.

Here are some tips to help you build a career in Special Collections despite the challenges.

Focus on skills

Special Collections staff need many skills, including:

  1. ‘Traditional skills’. These are distinctive to Special Collections, or shared with specialist academics and colleagues.  Traditional skills include:
  • Historical bibliography: how items in collections were made.
  • Preservation: how to look after collections.
  • Cataloguing: how to describe collections so people can discover them.
  • Languages: Latin is particularly useful, though not always essential.
  • Palaeography: how to read handwriting.
  • Subject and collection knowledge.
  1. Soft skills. You will need to be able to communicate effectively orally and in writing, to work well in a team but to manage your own time, including conflicting priorities, and to be able to help users of all kinds and levels of experience.
  2. Future skills. The Special Collections librarian of the future will need to be equipped for a tough and fast-changing world. Consider:
  • Digital literacy – encompasses a huge range of skills and will continue to develop.
  • Advocacy and evidence-based practice. Understanding statistics is essential!
  • Knowledge of legal and contractual issues.

But please don’t be too put off by these huge lists.  Skills are built up gradually and not all jobs require everything all at once.  There are many ways to improve your skills, even if you are unable to attend conferences or training events.  Consider apps (very useful for languages), online learning resources, webinars, reading printed books, not to mention the resources which appear below under ‘Connections’.

Seek and seize opportunities

For example:

  1. Your job title may not involve Special Collections, but maybe you can find a way to work with collections in the organisation. If you are working in a library, there are probably distinctive collections somewhere on the premises.  Consider talking to colleagues and managers about your interests so they can help you find opportunities.  Some element of voluntary work could be helpful and would show evidence of commitment to the sector as well as boosting your skills.
  2. Conference bursaries. Most significant library conferences offer these, in exchange for helping out and/or writing a report about your experience.

Build connections

Join and engage with relevant groups, such as CILIP Rare Books and Special Collections Group and the Historic Libraries Forum.

It is easier than ever to connect with Special Collections communities:

  1. Social media platforms: full of librarians, archivists, scholars and enthusiasts sharing collections objects and discussing the joys and challenges of their work. Watch out for ‘chats’ and other themed events. I recommend #uklibchat, #archivehour, and, coming up later in November, #explorearchives.  You can also join in with conferences via their hashtags, such as the recent #rbscg17 and forthcoming #dcdc17.
  2. Mailing lists reach all professionals including those who aren’t active on social media. Lis-rarebooks is a low-traffic list populated by helpful rare book people.
  3. In recent years more and more librarians and heritage professionals have set up their own events and groups. Watch out for such activities as teachmeets, show and tell, and unconferences.  These often take place out of working hours so folk in less relevant jobs can still attend.  See for example Heritage Show and Tell.

Think like an employer

Most Special Collections jobs are in public sector organisations, which recruit and select via automated and standardised processes which aim to be fair to all applicants.  You need to engage with these systems but make sure you stand out.

Above all, if you are asked for an example during the application process or an interview, give a strong, real one that illustrates your skills.  Employers are looking for specific examples not vague generalisations.  Do draw on whatever work experience you have, for example dealing with difficult customers or teamwork can be demonstrated well by experiences from shop or bar work.

Persist, but be flexible

It took me eight years from qualifying as a librarian to becoming a full-time Special Collections person, so I do understand that it is not easy.  It is worth reflecting on what attracts you about Special Collections work, and being open to other opportunities that may give you similar job satisfaction.   Many roles in heritage, education and the arts offer similar rewards.

Best of luck!

About the author9781783301263

Alison Cullingford is the author of the Special Collections Handbook, now in its second edition.  She is Special Collections Librarian at the University of Bradford and loves writing, blogging and tweeting about the challenges and rewards of working with heritage.  Her website is https://specialcollectionshandbook.com/ and she tweets as @speccollbrad.

About this blog post

This post was inspired by talks and discussions at CILIP Rare Books Group New Professionals Days, held in 2015 and 2017.  Thanks to all who were involved, and follow the story of the days via the #RBNewProfs hashtag.

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Emergency planning for Special Collections

Flames

An open access chapter from the new edition of Alison Cullingford’s Special Collections Handbook is now available to view and download from the Facet Publishing website.

The chapter discusses threats that can destroy collections or items within them very quickly: the timescale for effective action is much shorter, so prevention, planning and rapid response are essential. The chapter covers:

  1. Causes and impact of emergencies in Special Collections, with particular emphasis on fire and water damage.
  2. How to prevent and prepare for emergencies via the emergency plan.
  3. Issues in responding to and recovering from emergencies.
  4. Planning for service continuity.
  5. Security issues and how to manage them
  6. Insurance issues.

Fully updated since the first edition, the Handbook covers all aspects of special collections work: preservation, developing collections, understanding objects, emergency planning, security, legal and ethical concerns, cataloguing, digitization, marketing, outreach, teaching, impact, advocacy and fundraising.

More information about the book and the open access chapter are available on the Facet website.

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Long-awaited new edition of the Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections now available

Facet Publishing have announced the release of the 3rd edition of the Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.9781783300167

The Directory is the only publication to bring together rare book and special collections from all kinds of libraries across the UK and Ireland and is an essential research tool for researchers and librarians throughout the world.

Fully updated since the second edition was published in 1997, this comprehensive and up-to-date guide encompasses collections held in national libraries, academic libraries,  public libraries, subscription libraries, clergy libraries, libraries for other professions, school libraries, companies, London clubs, museums and archives, and libraries in stately homes.

Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian at the University of Oxford said, “The new edition is a long-awaited reference work which will help researchers identify the UK and Republic of Ireland’s great collections of research materials. It provides detailed and authoritative information and is a must for all serious researchers.”

Edited by Karen Attar, Curator of Rare Books and University Art at Senate House Library, The Directory:

  • contains a national, cross-sectoral overview of rare book and special collections
  • offers full contact details, and descriptions of rare book and named special collections including quantities and particular subject and language strengths
  • provides a quick and easy summary of individual libraries’ holdings
  • directs researchers to the libraries most relevant for them
  • assists libraries to evaluate their special collections according to a ‘unique and distinctive’ model
  • enables libraries to make informed decisions about acquisition and collaboration
  • helps booksellers and donors to target offers.

David Prosser, Executive Director of Research Libraries UK said, “Together, institutions in the UK and Ireland hold unrivalled special collections.  From our great National Libraries, through university collections to the smaller collections of specialist societies, cathedrals, historic homes, and museums we have a centuries-old tradition of collecting, preserving and giving access.  Scholars from around the world and across disciplinary differences rely on the treasures held by libraries listed in the Directory to pursue their research and help us make sense of the world in which we live.”

Up-to-date guidance on the complexities of copyright legislation for archivists and records managers

What is copyright? Who owns it and for how long? What rights does it confer, and what are the limitations and exceptions?

Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers uniquely outlines copyright law in the UK with special reference to materials relevant to archive and records collections such as maps, legal records, records of local authorities, records of churches and faiths, most notably unpublished works. It also offers advice on rights in the electronic environment and the problems associated with rights clearance; and covers related areas such as moral rights and rights in databases.Padfield_Copyright for archivists 5e_COVER

The fifth edition of this respected work has been extensively revised and updated to include:

  • a description of the major changes to copyright exceptions and limitations for libraries and archives, including changes to library and archive copying for users and the declaration, changes to preservation copying and a new exception permitting on-site access to digital material
  • a major revision of the sections on copyright exceptions, including descriptions of the extension of preservation copying to museums, orphan works schemes, education, parody, text and data mining, quotation and private copying
  • information about dealing with copyright, including acknowledgements and liability,a new small claims procedure in the courts of England and Wales, and which courts have jurisdiction over an infringement on the internet
  • consideration of the many copyright cases that have come before the courts that have provided help with the interpretation of many aspects of the legislation; including the meaning of ‘transient and incidental’, ‘scientific research’, ‘parody’ and ‘originality’; whether hyperlinking infringes copyright; and the relationship between the rights of a copyright owner and freedom of speech.

Tim Padfield said, “I am sorry that archivists and records managers keep having to buy new editions of this book, but a book on the law is of no use if it is out of date. In this case the law has changed very significantly since the previous edition, particularly for those working with archives and records and in libraries, educational establishments and museums. I hope it will continue to be useful”.

More details about Copyright for Archivists and Records Managers and a free sample chapter can be found on the Facet website.