Category: Technology

New guide to data-driven decision-making for library improvement

Facet Publishing have announced the publication of Library Improvement through Data Analytics by Lesley S. J. Farmer and Alan M. Safer.Farmer & Safer_FACET COVER_04

This book shows how to make sense of data in libraries and use it to inform decision making at every level.

Sound data analytics is the foundation for making an evidence-based case for libraries, in addition to guiding myriad organizational decisions, from optimizing operations for efficiency to responding to community needs. Designed to be useful for beginners as well as those with a background in data, this book introduces the basics of a six point framework that can be applied to a variety of library settings for effective system based, data-driven management.

The guide covers such key topics as:

  • the basics of statistical concepts
  • recommended data sources for various library functions and processes, and guidance for using census, university, or chamber of comm
    erce data in analysis
  • techniques for cleaning data
  • matching data to appropriate data analysis methods
  • how to make descriptive statistics more powerful by spotlighting relationships
  • 14 case studies which address such areas as digitization, e-book collection development and reference
  • staffing, facilities, and instruction.

This book’s clear, concise coverage will enable readers of every experience level to gain a better understanding of statistics in order to facilitate library improvement. It will be essential reading for library managers and key decision makers.

More information: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=301614

New edited collection on managing digital cultural objects

Facet Publishing have announced the publication of Managing Digital Cultural Objects: Analysis, discovery and retrieval edited by Allen Foster and Pauline Rafferty both at Aberystwyth University.Foster & R Managing digital cultural objects_COVER

The book explores the analysis and interpretation, discovery and retrieval of a variety of non-textual objects, including image, music and moving image.

Bringing together chapters written by leading experts in the field, the first part of this book provides an overview of the theoretical and academic aspects of digital cultural documentation and considers both technical and strategic issues relating to cultural heritage projects, digital asset management and sustainability. The second part includes contributions from practitioners in the field focusing on case studies from libraries, archives and museums. While the third and final part considers social networking and digital cultural objects.

Managing Digital Cultural Objects: Analysis, discovery and retrieval draws from disciplines including information retrieval, library and information science (LIS), digital preservation, digital humanities, cultural theory, digital media studies and art history. It’s argued that this multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach is both necessary and useful in the age of the ubiquitous and mobile web.

Key topics covered include:

  • Managing, searching and finding digital cultural objects
  • Data modelling for analysis, discovery and retrieval
  • Social media data as a historical source
  • Visual digital humanities
  • Digital preservation of audio content
  • Photos on social networking sites
  • Searching and creating affinities in web music collections
  • Film retrieval on the web.

The book will provide inspiration for students seeking to develop creative and innovative research projects at Masters and PhD levels and will be essential reading for those studying digital cultural object management. Equally, it should serve practitioners in the field who wish to create and develop innovative, creative and exciting projects in the future.

About the editors:

Allen Foster has a BA in Social History, a Master’s in Information Management and a PhD in Information Science.  As Reader in Information Science, he has held various roles, including Head of Department for Information Studies, at Aberystwyth University.  His research interest areas span the research process of Master’s and
PhD students, the development of models for information behaviour and serendipity, and user experience of information systems, creativity and information retrieval. He has guest edited for several journal special issues, is a regional editor for The Electronic Library and is a member of journal editorial boards, international panels and conference committees.

Dr Pauline Rafferty MA(Hons) MSc MCLIP is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Teaching and Learning at the Department of Information Studies, Aberystwyth University. She previously taught at the Department of Information Science, City University London, and in the School of Information Studies and Department of Media and Communication at the University of Central England, Birmingham.

Contributors:

Sarah Higgins, Aberystwyth University

Katrin Weller, GESIS Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

Hannah Dee, Aberystwyth University

Lorna Hughes, University of Glasgow

Lloyd Roderick, Aberystwyth University

Alexander Brown,  Aberystwyth University

Maureen Pennock, British Library

Michael Day, British Library

Will Prentice, British Library

Corinne Jörgensen, Florida State University (Emeritus)

Nicola Orio, University of Padua

Kathryn La Barre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Rosa Ines de Novias Cordeiro, Federal Fluminense University, Rio de Janeiro

Practical guidance on using altmetrics to measure, share, connect and communicate research

Facet Publishing have announced the release of Altmetrics: A practical guide for librarians, researchers and academics, edited by Andy Tattersall.9781783300105

This new book brings together experts in their fields to guide readers through the practical and technical aspects of altmetrics.

Altmetrics focuses on research artefact level metrics that are not exclusive to traditional journal papers but also extend to book chapters, posters and data sets, among other items. It offers additional indicators of attention, review and impact that add highly responsive layers to the slower to accrue traditional research metrics.

Contributed to by leading atmetric innovators including Euan Adie, founder and CEO of Altmetric.com, William Gunn, Head of Academic Outreach at Mendeley and Ben Showers, author of the bestselling Library Analytics and Metrics, the book details  the methods that can be employed to reach different audiences, even with  only minimal resources.

The book explains the theory behind altmetrics and provides practical advice to using the  increasing number of tools available for librarians and researchers to measure, share, connect and communicate research including Academia.edu, Facebook, Mendeley, ResearchGate, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Figshare, Altmetric.com, SlideShare Kudos and many more.

Anyone wanting to understand altmetrics and encourage others to use it will find this book essential reading including library and information professionals working in higher education, researchers, academics and higher education leaders and strategi
sts.

The editor, Andy Tattersall, has also made a video to complement the book which provides a whistle-stop tour of altmetrics and associated tools. The video can be viewed here.

About the authors:
Andy Tattersall (editor) writes and gives talks about digital academia, learning technology, scholarly communications, open research, web tools, altmetrics and social media– in particular, their application for research, teaching, learning, knowledge management and collaboration. He is very interested in how we manage information and how information overload affects our professional and personal lives. His teaching interests lie in encouraging colleagues and students to use the many tools and technologies(quite often freely) available to aid them carry out research and collaboration within the academic and clinical setting. He is Secretary for the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals – Multi Media and Information Technology Committee.

Euan Adie is founder and CEO of Altmetric.com, which supplies altmetrics data to funders, universities and publishers. Originally a computational biologist at the University of Edinburgh, in 2005 Euan developed postgenomic.com, which aggregated blog posts written by life scientists about published scholarly articles. This effort was supported by Nature Publishing Group, where he then worked in product management roles until starting Altmetric.com in 2011.

Claire Beecroft is a university teacher/information specialist at the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR), the University of Sheffield. Claire currently teaches on a variety of courses within ScHARR and the wider university, including the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) and the MScs in Health Informatics, Public Health and HTA. Claire’s key research interests are around e-learning, e-health, applications of Web 2.0 to healthcare, teaching of health informatics and information skills and support for NHS librarians and staff to develop key informatics skills. Her main teaching interests are around literature searching and evidence retrieval, critical appraisal, e-health, telemedicine, media portrayal of health research and health economics, and information study skills.

Dr Andrew Booth is Reader in Evidence Based Information Practice at the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR), University of Sheffield. Between 2008 and 2014 he served as Director of Research Information (Outputs) for ScHARR, helping to prepare the school’s Research Excellence Framework submission. Prior to this he worked in a wide range of roles supporting research data management, information management and evidence-based practice and delivering writing workshops to researchers. With a background in information science, Andrew has a particular interest in bibliometrics and literature review. Andrew currently serves on the editorial boards of Systematic Reviews, Implementation Science and Health Information & Libraries Journal. Over his 33-year career to date in health information management and health services research he has authored four books and over 150 peer-reviewed journal articles.

Dr William Gunn is the Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley. He attended Tulane University as a Louisiana Board of Regents Fellow, receiving his PhD in Biomedical Science from the Center for Gene Therapy at Tulane University. Frustrated with the inefficiencies of the modern research process, he left academia and established the biology programme at Genalyte, a novel diagnostics start-up, then joined Mendeley. Dr Gunn is an Open Access advocate, co-founder of the Reproducibility Initiative and serves on the National Information Standards Organisation (NISO) Altmetrics working group.

Ben Showers is a Digital Delivery Manager at the Cabinet Office, using digital technologies to transform government services and systems for the better.Previously,he worked at JISC where he was Head of Scholarly and Library Futures, working on projects that included a shared library analytics service, as well as projects exploring the future of library systems, digital libraries, usability and digitization. He is the author ofLibrary Analytics and Metrics: using data to drive decisions and services (Facet Publishing, 2015).

Copyright and E-learning: a guide for practitioners

Guest post by Jane Secker

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The second edition of the 2010 book Copyright and E-learning: A guide for practitioners is now available. The book covers the topic that has fascinated me for over a decade and been central to the job I do at LSE: copyright law and its relationship to e-learning or online learning.

This edition of the book benefits from being co-authored by Chris Morrison, who is Copyright Compliance and Licensing Officer at the University of Kent. Chris has not only helped me to improve and update the book, but made the research and writing process more enjoyable. When I first approached Chris to help update the book, I thought that his unbounded pedantry forensic attention to detail and wealth of knowledge about broader copyright issues might make him a useful proof-reader. I had done a first run through of the book to identify some key areas I wanted to update in light of the Hargreaves Review in 2014 and the new copyright exceptions in UK law. However, overall I felt much of the first edition might remain the same, perhaps with a few changes to take into account new terminology. It quickly became apparent once we started reviewing the content and discussing the book, that we had the opportunity to significantly update it, and make it a far better book. It was also clear I had more than a proof-reader but a co-author. As with any book about technology, 5 years is a long time, and technological developments made much of the contents of some chapters in need of real updating. For example, the term web 2.0 used throughout the first edition, really started to sound very dated.

Much of the intentions behind the first edition remain however. The book is designed to be read by practitioners and so it tries to offer pragmatic advice on a range of topics issues from digitising orphan works, to lecture recordings, the use of social media and MOOCs. We tried to write the book in a jargon-free easily digestible way, to hopefully make it a practical guide for learning technologists, but also teachers, lecturers and other learning support staff in higher education, schools, further education and even in a workplace learning setting, where online learning is used extensively.

Find out more about the book here or read Jane and Chris’ post on the CILIP blog where they provide six practical tips that are important to helping you approach any copyright issue.

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Image Credit: Flickr user eddiedangerousCopyright Sign, Image used under license (CC BY 2.0)